An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis
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Agriculture

Agriculture is generally accepted as the critical foundation for the development of any civilisation. Without it man would have remained a hunter-gatherer and have lacked the potential for generating surpluses, the division of labour and the establishment of urban communities. Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that if an ancient urban centre is found, it is evidence of the existence of agricultural skills in the locality at the time of its foundation. Evidence has now been gathered to demonstrate that alongside agriculture, carpentry also advanced, as shown by the improvement of woodworking tools at the same time(c). Studies published in 2013(b) indicate that farming first developed more or less simultaneously over a widespread area of the Middle East from Turkey to Iran.

At present the oldest known town is Jericho, which is now dated to around 9600 BC. Similarly, the remarkable discoveries at Göbekli Tepe, also dated to the same period, suggest a considerable settled community that would have been dependent on agriculture. There is now evidence that the first farmers grew rye and wheat in Syria around 11,000 BC.

A hugh cache of wild oats and barley, dated to 9000 BC, were discovered near Jericho in 2006(j).

In Egypt, prehistoric granaries that date back to the Neolithic era, which began around 9000 BC, have been discovered in Fayoum, south-west of Cairo.

R. Cedric Leonard has outlined on his website(a) a range of evidence that would seem to prove that agriculture existed in Egypt before the 9600 BC date that is recorded by Plato for the war with Atlantis.

*Peripheral to this, is a recent report that when hunter-gatherers encountered early farmers, they made love not war(k)!*

If Plato’s Atlantis existed, it is clear that agriculture was an important part of its economy. We are informed (Crit.118E) that two crops were harvested annually, thanks to rain in winter and irrigation canals in summer. Plato also mentions horses and cattle (Crit.117B). These references are written in the context of a need to feed a large city, not to mention its enormous army (and navy). Plato offers no suggestion than that this advanced agricultural system was anything other than part of an advanced Bronze Age society.

North African Algeria, Egypt and particularly Tunisia, were the ‘breadbasket’ of Rome and may also have been so for the Atlanteans who had control from North Africa to Tyrrhenia! Although, conditions have deteriorated over the past few millennia, Tunisia can still produce two crops a year in low-lying irrigated coastal regions.

The commencement of what we would recognise as agriculture began around the 10th millennium BC. So is theoretically possible that agriculture had developed somewhat by the early date of 9600 BC given by Plato for the war with Atlantis. However, the existence of anything over and above the level of subsistence farming, at this early date, is highly improbable. It would seem clear that Plato has described the agriculture of a Bronze Age civilisation because he would have had no clear idea regarding its state of development in preceding millennia.

A 2013 paper(h) from Tübingen University has demonstrated that studies “show that the origins of agriculture in the Near East can be attributed to multiple centers rather than a single core area and that the eastern Fertile Crescent played a key role in the process of domestication.” 

In 2008, archaeologist Melinda Zeder offered evidence that the domestication of animals began around the same time as the management of crops in the 9th and 10th millennia BC in the Near East. These new skills gradually spread throughout the length of the Mediterranean. In the same year Dr. Robin Allaby of Warwick presented a paper in which he pushed back the date for the gathering of wild cereals to before the last glacial maximum (18,000-15,000 years ago).

Even more dramatic is a more recent claim(i) that the dawn of agriculture can be pushed back to 23,000 years ago.

It is interesting that Plato also lists (Crit.115b) produce that possibly grew wild or may have been cultivated:

  • Pulses
  • Fruits having a hard rind providing drinks, meats and ointments
  • Chestnuts
  • Fruits that spoil with keeping
  • The ‘pleasant’ kind of dessert

It would be worthwhile to investigate whether all the products mentioned by Plato are consistent with the same geographical latitude. Diodorus Siculus recorded that the Atlanteans did not know the fruits of Ceres – cereals. In fact, according to Wikipedia, cereals were unknown to American Indians. Rand and Rose Flem-Ath have an interesting chapter[062.12] on the subject of agriculture and its development in the context of their own theories. In 2013, Rand Flem-Ath republished(d) his paper on the origins of agriculture that first appeared in The Anthropological Journal of Canada in 1981.

*Dale Drinnon’s website has an extensive article(l) on the development of agriculture globally.*

A more recent article considers the possibility that the introduction of agriculture may have inadvertently led to the endangerment of some early civilisations. The author, Annalee Newitz, editor-in-chief of io9.com cites the abandonment of Catal Höyuk as an example(g).

(a) http://atlantisquest.com/Agriculture.html

(b) http://news.discovery.com/human/life/ancient-farming-iran-lithic-130714.htm#mkcpgn=emnws1

(c) http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112673605/neolithic-carpentry-081012/

(d) http://www.flem-ath.com/flemath/a-global-climatic-model-for-the-origins-of-agriculture/ (offline Feb. 2016 – See Archive 2247)

(e) http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/11/science/12visuals.html?_r=0

(f) http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/research_pushes_back/

(g) http://io9.com/how-farming-almost-destroyed-human-civilization-1659734601

(h) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130705101629.htm

(i) http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/archaeology/1.667258

(j) http://www.jpost.com/Health-and-Sci-Tech/Science-And-Environment/11000-year-old-grain-shakes-up-beliefs-on-beginnings-of-agriculture

*(k) https://www.seeker.com/culture/archaeology/ancient-hunter-gatherers-and-farmers-made-love-not-war

(l) http://frontiers-of-anthropology.blogspot.ie/2012/03/reassessment-of-atlantean-agriculture.html*