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Archaeoastronomy

Archaeoastronomy is a relatively new scientific discipline, which as the name implies combines archaeology and astronomy, particularly in the study of ancient megalithic monuments and their possible alignment with various celestial bodies.

Arguably the most famous example is Stonehenge, but our globe is littered with ancient monuments incorporating solar, lunar or astral alignments. Not all are as impressive or accessible as Stonehenge, Callanish or Newgrange but in remote places such as Nabta Playa or Fajada Butte (see Hadingham[1308.152]).

The subject was initially considered by some to be a ‘fringe’ topic, but in 1999 Clive Ruggles was appointed Professor of Archaeoastronomy at the University of Leicester(a) and is the author of the encyclopedic Ancient Astronomy[1310].

The University of Maryland has had a Center for Archaeoastronomy since 1978(c).

The subject has never been central to Atlantis studies, but has hovered in the background, with writers such a Egerton Sykes(b) and Graham Hancock[855][1119 who employed aspects of the discipline in their publications.

Archaeoastronomy is one of only a few dozen words with four consecutive vowels.

(a) http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/people/emeritus/ruggles

(b) http://www.seachild.net/http://atlantipedia.ie/samples/main-bibliography/d/atlantology/fields/archaeo.html

(c) http://terpconnect.umd.edu/~tlaloc/archastro/