An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Mljet

Mljet is a Croatian island in the Adriatic nearly opposite Dubrovnik. It is one of the many locations claimed as Homer’s Ogygia, mljetwhich in turn has been identified by some as Atlantis. This is not the only controversial matter associated with the island, Mljet in Greek is Melite a name it shares with Malta. For centuries there has been a strong tradition on Mljet that St. Paul was in fact shipwrecked on their island. The evidence(a)(b) is quite strong and worthy of investigation.

The claim was expounded in a 1730 monograph by Ignjat Durdevic*(Ignazio Giorgi)(1675-1737) who hailed from Dubrovnik. A refutation[1462] by the Maltese poet Giovanni Antonio Ciantar (1696-1778) followed a few years later.

Recently, new information in The Geography of Ananias of Širak, written between 592-636 AD, confirms that Saint Paul stayed in Dalmatia following a shipwreck that happened on the Adriatic island of Melita (Mljet)(d).

According to Heinz Warnecke, another serious contender for the location of Paul’s shipwreck is Argostoli near the island of Cephalonia(c). At the other end of the spectrum, Kenneth Humphreys offers evidence, which demonstrates that the entire Pauline story is a concoction(e).

Further rivalry concerns the origin of the name of the toy dog breed, the Maltese. Callimachus around 350 BC attributing the honour to Mljet, while John Caius, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, maintained that he was referring to Melita in the Sicilian Strait.

(a) http://www.croatianhistory.net/etf/st_paul.html

(b) http://www.croatia.org/crown/articles/9904/1/Miho-Demovic-Two-millenia-of–St-Pauls-shipwreck-near-the-Croatian-island-of-Mljet.html

(c) http://www.ionion.com/english/kefalonia/culture/monasteries/enstpaul.htm

(d) http://www.croatianhistory.net/etf/st_paul.html

(e) http://www.jesusneverexisted.com/shipwreck.html