An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Pfund, Charles D. (L)

Charles D. Pfund is a New York State correctional officer and the author of Antediluvian World: The End of the Myth[1079],  a rough draft version of which can read online(a).  His website(b) begins with an examination of a 1482 map by the Italian cartographer Francesco Berlinghieri. A version of his map depicts the Fortunate Islands as a large island with mountains in the Atlantic off the coast of Africa. Pfund thenPfund1 compares this speculative map with underwater features in the region revealed by modern technology and percieves a match. He then proceeds to identify these features as Atlantis, which include the Canaries in the south stretching northward to include the Madeira archipelago.

Among the many other controversial claims made by Pfund is a 10,000 BC date for the existence of Atlantis,  that Achilles was Atlas and that Atlanteans resettled Greece after the Flood

Pfund then unexpectedly includes a discussion on ancient ‘divination livers’(c) found in Mesopotamia and claims that some of them represent his Atlantis in the Atlantic! It is clear that the author’s source of inspiration is the work of Donnelly, whom he refers to as the ‘Great’ Ignatius Donnelly (although omitted from the index!).

I am not convinced. However, anyone wishing to investigate his ideas further must read his first book and hope that Pfund can get his second volume published. Overall, whatever one might think about Pfund’s theories, you cannot help admiring the level of research that went into the writing of this book. In my opinion the input of a professional editor would have improved the text as there is a lot of repetition, even unnecessarily repeating images. There is also an irritating overuse of bold text and underlining, reminiscent of tabloid newspapers.

(a) http://atlantismapped.com/antediluvian-world.pdf

(b) http://atlantismapped.com/index.html

(c) http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/model-liver-divination