An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis
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Atlantic

Castro, Domingos Leite de

Domingos Leite de Castro (1846-1916) was a Portuguese commentator who identified the Atlantic seaboard of Europe as Atlantean. The following is a machine translation of his original 1912 Portuguese article[1480][1481];

[“A Atlântida era apenas o litoral atlântico da Europa desde o Atlas até à Irlanda; “Atlantis was only the Atlantic coast of Europe from the Atlas to Ireland; O reino de Atlas, um The kingdom of Atlas, a dos dez reinos da Atlântida, foi o primeiro, o mais importante do grupo, e o que lhe deu o nome; of the ten kingdoms of Atlantis, was the first, the most important of the group, and what gave it the name; Os the outros eram: Cádis, Cartara ( Cartaya ?), o Sacrum (compreendendo S. Vicente e Santa Maria), os others were: Cadiz, Cartara ( Cartaya ?), The Sacrum (comprising S. Vicente and Santa Maria), the Saefes e Cempses ao sul da Arrábida, Oliusippo , Brigância, Grã-Bretanha e Irlanda; Saefes and Cempses to the south of the Arrábida, Oliusippo , Brigance, Great Britain and Ireland; A Grande Ilha da The Big Island of Atlântida não era nada mais que a Grã-Bretanha, isto é, um dos dez povos que ocupavam esse litoral; Atlantis was nothing more than Great Britain, that is to say, one of the ten peoples who occupied this coast; As Dez Ilhas Cassitérides eram muito provavelmente o mesmo que os Dez Reinos da Atlântida, The Ten Cassitérides Islands were very probably the same as the Ten Realms of Atlantis considered the tin entire market.”

Morales, Ernesto

Ernesto Morales (1890-1949) was the Argentinian author of many historical books including a 1940 volume, Atlántida[1398], in which he reportedly located Atlantis in the Atlantic.

Kushi, Michio (N)

Michio Kushi (1926-2014) was a Japanese promoter of modern macrobiotics, which he helped to introduce to the United States after moving there after the war.

In 1992, he teamed up with a colleague, Edward Esko, to write Forgotten Worlds[1381] in which they proposed that Atlantis, situated in the Atlantic had been destroyed as a result of a Pole Shift.

Landbridges

Landbridges, in the distant past are believed to have played a critical part in early human migration. Similarly, migration-routeslandbridges,both real and speculative are important components in many Atlantis theories. There is no doubt that the ending of the last Ice Age and the consequent rising sea levels led to the creation of islands where continuous land has previously existed. The separation of Ireland and Britain from each other and from mainland Europe is just one example, the latter leading to a number of writers to identify ‘Doggerland‘, which lay between Britain and Denmark as the home of Atlantis.

The two most discussed landbridges were at the Bering Strait, where it is thought that it provided the gateway for humans to enter the Americas from Asia and an Atlantic landbridge, which was very popular at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries, but now completely abandoned. Although there was only one suggestion that the Bering Strait was in anyway connected with Plato’s Atlantis, an Atlantic landbridge was seized upon by many leading scientists of the day as an explanation for the similarity of flora and fauna on both sides of the Atlantic, which was reinforced by the discovery of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge around the same time.

A number of landbridges have been proposed for the Mediterranean and linked to a variety of Atlantis theories, the most notable being proposed for the straits of Gibraltar, Sicily and Messina. Less popular theories have been constructed involving landbridges in locations, such as the Caribbean and Indonesia.

Baker, Alan

alan-bakerAlan Baker (1964- ) is an English author with a mixed output of both non-fiction as well as some fiction. His chief interest would appear to be historical mysteries, which led to the publication of The Enigmas of History[1306]. This book touches on a number of subjects covered on this site; Noah‘s Deluge, Stonhenge, Amazons and, of course, Atlantis. He briefly discusses a few of the more popular theories; Bimini, Thera, and the Atlantic, but arrives at no firm conclusion, although he appears sympathetic to its existence. In his Destination Earth[1030] he delves into the disappearance of Percy Fawcett and the mysteries relating to South America.

Golbéry, Sylvain Meinrad Xavier de (L)

Sylvain Meinrad Xavier de Golbéry (1742-1822) was a geographer and military engineer. He is best known for his account[1297] of his travels in western Africa. His book was translated into English by W. Mudford with a new title of Travels in Africa[1298]. He refers to Atlantis in the Atlantic with the Azores and Canarieshttp://atlantipedia.ie/samples/canary-islands/ as ‘its shattered remains’[p.207] with a possible connection with the Atlantes of northwest Africa.

Durrett, Reuben T. (N)

Reuben T. Durrett (1824-1913) was a lawyer, historian and bibliographer, who had a library of some 50,000 volumes.  reuben-t-durrettAmong his many works was Traditions of The Earliest Visits of Foreigners to North America[1283] in which he devoted considerable space to the subject of Atlantis, which he viewed as a large Atlantic island. He suggested that instead of the belief that the inhabitants of this island peopled America, that we should consider the possibility that the original Americans peopled this Atlantic island!

Regarding the demise of Atlantis he suggests that “All of Plato’s island, however, might not have gone down. Indeed, it is possible that the Azores, the Madeiras, the Canaries, and even the British Islands, as parts of the ill-fated island, may have been left above water when the main island went down amid earthquakes and inundations.”

Davies, Edward

Edward Davies (1756-1831) was a Welsh clergyman with a keen interest in Celtic culture and origins. Although he published two books on the subject in the early 19th century, today, he is considered unreliable.

In The Mythology and Rites of the British Druids[1288] he touches briefly on the subject of Atlantis aligning himself with the views of another Anglican, George Faber, who placed Atlantis in the Atlantic.