An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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George Stanley Faber

Faber, George Stanley (L)

George Stanley Faber (1773-1854) was an Anglican theologian andFaber a prolific writer. In his three-volume The Origin of Pagan Idolatry[0962] he touched on the destruction of Atlantis. He assumed that Atlantis was situated in the Atlantic just beyond Gibraltar, but that in the beginning, the Atlantic was not connected to the Mediterranean. However, he echoed the view of some of his peers and proposed that an “extraordinary influx” of water from the rivers of Europe raised the level of the Mediterranean which combined with an earthquake burst the isthmus joining Europe and Africa at Gibraltar and the sudden outflow into the Atlantic washed away Atlantis.[0962.v2.160].

Jason Colavito has traced many of Ignatius Donnelly’s ideas back to Faber and beyond.(a)   

(a)  http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/a-byzantine-claim-about-atlantis-and-noahs-flood

Cosmas Indicopleustes

Cosmas Indicopleustes was a 6th century AD theologian and geographer from Alexandria who became a monk in later life. He wrote of Atlantis as a large island in the western ocean punished by god with submergence. He also added a twist to the tale by recording a tradition that Noah had resided on Atlantis. Cosmas was probably the first writer to use Plato’s tale as evidence for the veracity of the Bible. He contended that Atlantis was the Garden of Eden and that Plato’s 10 kings of Atlantis were the 10 generations between Adam and Noah!

His only extant book, Christian Topography, is a bizarre work that includes support for a Flat (Square) Earth. A translation[1245] by J. W. McCrindle was published by the Hakluyt Society in 1897(b).

Cosmas has added little to the Atlantis story except further confusion.

One commentator described his work as a ‘monument of unconscious humour.’

Jason Colavito has traced(a) some of Graham Hancock’s theories back through Donnelly, Faber, and Bailly and even as far as Cosmas.

(a) http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/a-byzantine-claim-about-atlantis-and-noahs-flood

(b) http://www.sacred-texts.com/earth/ct/index.htm