An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Gerald Massey

Churchward, Albert

Albert Churchward (1852-1925) was a younger brother of James Churchward, the ‘inventor’ of Mu. Although trained as a medical practitioner,albert churchward his real passion was the study of the early development of religion[943] and the later development of Christianity from Egyptian origins. In that respect he was greatly influenced by the work of Gerald Massey(a)(c). He makes no reference to Mu or Atlantis, because he either disagreed with his brother’s views or just did not wish to tread on his literary toes! His book The Origin and Evolution of the Human Race[903] can now be read online(b).

(a) http://www.peuplesawa.com/fr/bnlogik.php?bnid=759&bnk=&bnrub=&vip=581

(b) http://www.cedarcitylodge.org/books/origin_and_evolution.pdf

*(c) http://gerald-massey.org.uk/massey/cmc_churchward.htm (link broken April 2019) See: https://web.archive.org/web/20180316022505/http://gerald-massey.org.uk/massey/cmc_churchward.htm*

Taylor, Thomas

Thomas_TaylorThomas Taylor (1758-1835) was the first to publish, in English, the complete works of Plato and Aristotle, in 1804. His publication was the completion of valuable work begun by the unfortunate Floyer Sydenham. Taylor is regarded by some as having had a valuable insight into the mind of Plato, which made his translations superior to many others. In 2009, a five volume, first edition set went on sale for $22,000.

Although Taylor’s work was generally well received, a subsequent translation by Rev. Henry Davis scathingly referred to Taylor’s work as “uncouth, obscure, unEnglish and often extremely erroneous.”  Nevertheless, Madame Blavatsky and other theosophists were very happy with Taylor’s translation.

A reprint[644] of Taylor’s 1810 translation of Timaeus and Critias has been made available by Kessinger Publishing. Unfortunately, it does not include the Stephanus pagination references, which makes navigation a little more difficult.

However, an extensive website dealing with the work of Gerald Massey(b) includes Taylor’s translation of Plato’s Critias and Timaeus with pagination (see introduction Pt.5).

(b)  http://www.masseiana.org/intro.htm

Massey, Gerald

gerald_masseyGerald Massey (1828-1907) was an English poet and self-taught Egyptologist. One result of his studies was to identify the Egyptian god Horus with Jesus. On the subject of Atlantis, Massey claimed that sun-worshipping Atlanteans migrated to Egypt but failed to identify their place of origin. His huge work on ancient Egypt, Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World[1515], is widely available.

There are extensive websites(a)(b) dealing with his work which include Thomas Taylor’s translation of Plato’s Critias and Timaeus as well as Proclus’ commentary on Timaeus.

(a) http://www.masseiana.org/intro.htm (offline Nov.2017) 

(b) http://gerald-massey.org.uk/massey/index.htm (offline Nov. 2017) 

 

Proclus

Proclus Lycaeus (412-487) is considered the last major Greek philosopher. ProclusHe came from a rich family in Constantinople. After studying in Alexandria and a brief legal career in Constantinople, he went to Athens to study at the famous School of Philosophy founded 800 years earlier by Plato.

He refers to ancient historians mentioning seven small islands in the Outer Ocean (Atlantic) dedicated to Persephone and three larger ones, of which one was 1,000 stadia long and dedicated to Poseidon.

It was Proclus who recorded(d) that Crantor travelled to Sais, as part of his research for Plato’s biography and like Solon was shown the pillars on which the Atlantis story was recorded.

In 1820, Thomas Taylor produced the only English translation that we have of Proclus’ commentary. Andrew Collins has drawn attention[0072.100] to a translation error by Taylor, noted by Alan Cameron and Peter James, which seems to offer a quote from Plato rather than Crantor, which in turn obscures whether it was Crantor or Plato actually travelled to Egypt.

A website(a) dealing with the works of Gerald Massey includes Thomas Taylor’s translation of Proclus’ commentary on Plato’s Timaeus(b).

Taylor notes that in a fragment from a lost book of Proclus, he seems to refer to orichalcum under the name of migma(c).

*(a)  http://www.masseiana.org/intro.htm (offline Nov. 2017)

(b)  https://archive.org/details/ProcluscommentaryOnTheTimaeusOfPlato    *

 

(c)  http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/flwp/flwp26.htm

(d) In Platonis Theologiam