An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

NEWS


Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


Learn More


Search

Recent Updates

Gerald Wells

Geomythology

Geomythology is a word coined by the geologist Dorothy Vitaliano in her 1973 book Legends of the Earth[306] to describe the study of alleged references to geological events in mythology.”

Since then, the term has gradually gained widespread acceptance including an extensive entry in the Encyclopedia of Geology(a).  The status of the subject has been consolidated by its inclusion as a separate course at the University of Puget Sound(b). Apart from Vitaliano other writers, such as Gerald Wells, have applied geomythology to the study of Atlantis without necessarily using the term(e). I should point out that mythology is also used to transmit details of spectacular astronomical events as well as more mundane political or military exploits.

Further support for the young discipline came with the publication of Myth and Geology by the Geological Society of London in 2007, with Luigi Piccardi & Bruce Masse as editors[1541].

Patrick Nunn, an Australian geologist, who although an Atlantis sceptic has begun to reconsider the possibility of ancient myths containing important geological information(c).

Cindy Clendenon, presumably inspired by Vitaliano, has launched a related new specialised field of study, which she has named ‘hydromythology’ in her 2009 book, Hydromythology and the Ancient Greek World[0801], a review of which is available online(d).

(a) http://www.stanford.edu/dept/HPST/MayorGeomythology.pdf

(b) http://www2.ups.edu/faculty/jtepper/Geomythology/Geomyth.htm

(c) http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160118-the-atlantis-style-myths-of-sunken-lands-that-are-really-true

(d) http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-08-65.html

*(e) https://www.wrl-inc.org/tag/geomythology (link broken Aug.2019)*

Wells, Gerald

Gerald Wells is an American researcher who had opted for the western province of El Bayadh in Algeria as the location of Atlantis. Gerald WellsHe uses geomythology to advance the radical idea that Atlantis was destroyed by a ‘tectonic tilting and continental uplift’ at the end of the Younger Dryas.

 In another paper(c), Wells offers further geological evidence that Atlantis did not sink, but only appeared to do so, while it actually rose. If so, I wonder how could such an event create muddy shallows (Timaeus 25d) that existed as a navigation hazard even in Plato’s time.

Wells has offered ten important correlations between Plato’s description and the physical evidence available at his chosen site on the western edge of the Sahara. These include an extensive canal system, red, white and black stone, a complex of meteorite craters (Rings of Atlantis) and hydrothermal springs. Wells further contends that Atlantis was known in pre-dynastic Egypt as Bakhu. However, there is a consensus among other scholars that Bakhu was a mount in the EAST, whereas Wells’ Atlantis/Bakhu is in the WEST. Wells’ ideas were presented to the 2008 Atlantis Conference in Athens and are now available on the Internet(a).

Now that he has been granted tax-exemption status in the U.S. he is hoping to raise $250,000 to fund an initial two week survey. See his new web address(b).

Wells has now produced a video(d) in support of his theories.*Apart from that little has been heard from Wells in recent years. In fact, most of the links to his material are now offline apart from(c).

(a) http://www.Atlantis-bakhu.com (offline June 2017)

(b) http://www.wrl-inc.org/ (link broken Nov. 2019)

(c) http://www.wrl-inc.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/A-Focus-on-the-Geologic-Sciences-Related-to-Atlantis-Bakhu.pdf (link broken Nov. 2019) See: https://www.academia.edu/10055298/A_Focus_on_the_Geologic_Sciences_Related_to_Atlantis-Bakhu*

(d) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZmdvhh1jIk

 

Algeria

Algeria or more precisely the western province of El Bayadh at 31.84°North Latitude and 103.03°East Longitude has been identified by the American researcher Gerald Wells as the location of Atlantis.

A more frequent suggestion is that the chotts of Algeria and Tunisia had been the location of the legendary Lake Tritonis when the Sahara was a more fertile place. Ulrich Hofmann supports this view while Alberto Arecchi contends that Lake Tritonis was the ‘Atlantic Sea’ referred to by Plato, with the Pillars of Heracles situated at the Gulf of Gabes.Chott_el_Jerid