An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Holy Land

Eys, Peter van

Peter (Petrus) Van Eys was an 18th century Dutch scholar, who wrote in his 1715 PhD dissertation[1222] on Plato, of the connections he percieved between Moses and the story of Atlantis. This led him to conclude that Atlantis had been situated in the Holy Land, a view popular at that time.

[The above information was generously supplied by Stelios Pavlou]

Bonnaud, Jacques-Julien

Jacques-Julien Bonnaud (1710-1792) was a French abbot with a PhD in theology and law. In his 1786 book[0967], Hérodote historien du people hébreu sans le savoir (Herodotus, unknowingly the historian of the Hebrew people), he expressed the view that Plato’s Atlantis story was just a distorted description of the Holy Land. Bonnaud was killed during the 1792 September massacres of the French Revolution.

Fabricius, Johann Albert

Fabricius (1668-1736) was a prolific German scholar credited with writing Fabricius128 books, some of which can be read online(a).  He located Atlantis in the Holy Land, an idea popular with a number of writers of that period, such as Baër and Eurenius.

(a) http://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%22Johann%20Albert%20Fabricius%22%20AND%20(creator%3A%22Johann%20Albert%20Fabricius%22)

Sweden

Sweden was claimed to be the location of Atlantis by Olaus (Olaf) Rudbeck in the 17th century. Before him another Swede, Johannes Bureus, expressed similar views. His friend Carl Lundius supported Rudbeck’s theories, but received none of the acclaim.

In the 18th century Carl Friedrich Baër was happy to follow a fashion, which placed Atlantis in the Holy Land. I am not aware of any major Swedish contribution to Atlantology in the 19th century.

The discovery of the Mid Atlantic Ridge led René Malaise and Hans Pettersson to suggest the Azores as remnants of Atlantis, an idea still popular today. Around the same time Gunnar Rudberg proposed that Syracuse in Sicily had inspired some of Plato’s description of Atlantis.

Arvid Högbom advocated the North Sea as the location of Atlantis in 1915, long before Jürgen Spanuth. In the same region Nils Bergquist opted for the Dogger Bank as has Ulf Erlingsson.

More recently, we seem to have come full circle as Bertil Falk has revived some of Rudbeck’s ideas(a) and a short illustrated 2007 paper (updated 2015)(b) by Robert Fritzius also added some additional modern support. However, for something quite different we have Carl Festin promoting a Mediterranean location.

(a) http://www.vof.se/folkvett/ar-1993/nr-4/platons-atlantis-diktning-som-tagits-pa-allvar/ (Swedish)

*(b) http://www.datasync.com/~rsf1/vel/atlantis.htm (offline Feb. 2018)*

Holy Land (L)

The Holy Land is a term used to refer to that part of the eastern Mediterranean which the Old Testament records as having been given to the Israelites by God. It is now comprised of Israel, Palestinian territory, along with parts of Jordan and Lebanon.

The Holy Land was suggested by Serranus  in 1570 as the location of Atlantis. This idea was later echoed by  Gerardus Johannis Vossius and Carl Fredrich Baër who was Swedish, but lived in France during the 18th century. Another Swede, Johannes Eurenius also placed Atlantis in Holy Land in his 1751 book. Another 18th century scholar, Jacques Julien Bonnaud  was of the opinion[0967] that when Plato wrote about Atlantis, he was imperfectly describing the Holy Land! His book, Hérodote historien du peuple hébreu sans le savoir  is available as a free ebook(a).

In recent times a more radical view has been proposed by Professor Jaime Manuschevich who has identified modern Israel together the Sinai Peninsula as the true site of Atlantis.

(a) http://books.google.ie/books?id=QQooAAAAYAAJ&oe=UTF-8&redir_esc=y (French)

Olivier, Claude-Mathieu (m)

Claude-Mathieu Olivier (1701-1736) was a French theologian and lawyer from Marseilles, who published his Dissertation sur le Critias (Essay on the Critias) in 1726. In it he developed the rather daring theory that the ten kingdoms of Atlantis should be equated with the ten lost tribes of Israel and placed Atlantis in the Holy Land. His idea was a development of the suggestions of other writers of the period, such as Baër and Eurenius who also sought to link biblical history with that of Plato’s Atlantis.

 

 

Rudbeck, Olof

Olof (Olaus) Rudbeck, (1630-1702), was a 17th century nationalistic writer from Uppsala, Sweden (a very powerful nation at that time). He was a professor of botany and anatomy, Rudbeckand was one of two discoverers of the lymphatic vessels. He also had an interest in astronomy, taught mining and fortification theory and was Sweden’s first field archaeologist.

Olaf published, Atlantica between 1679 and 1702, in Latin, which placed Atlantis, not altogether surprisingly, in Sweden. This was a massive 2500 page work, published with the financial help of the Swedish king, in which he offered 102 ‘proofs’ to support his thesis. Atlantica included a map showing Uppsala as Atlantis(a). He also contended that Swedish was the root tongue of all languages!

Rudbeck built his Atlantis theory on a number of details, including references to the Icelandic Eddas.

  • He assumed that the mythical Swedish king Atle was the original Atlas,
  • He linked the Swedish Atlefjell (Atle’s Mountain) with the Atlas Mountains and an old name for Sweden was Atland, which crops up in the Oera Linda Book,
  • He cited Sweden’s large copper deposits as one of his proofs of his country’s identity with Plato’s Atlantis.

It is also of interest that Rudbeck was an early proponent of the idea that the ‘years’ referred to by Plato were in fact originally Egyptian ‘lunar cycles’ and concluded that Atlantis was destroyed circa 1500 BC.

Rudbeck also noted that the Greek word ‘nesos’ could mean ‘island’ OR ‘peninsula’, the latter being applicable to Sweden. He argued that the ‘Pillars of Heracles’ was a designation formerly used to refer to a number of locations. Rudbeck claimed that the Øresund strait between Sweden and Denmark was the site of the Atlantis ‘Pillars’.

It should be noted that Rudbeck’s theory was a development of the earlier ideas of another Swede, Johannes Bureus (1568-1652), a runic scholar, also born near Uppsala.

*Half a century after Rudbeck’s death, a fellow Swede, Johannes Jacobi Eurenius, wrote Atlantica Orientalis[1320]published in 1751, in which he placed Atlantis in the Holy Land and argued forcefully against Rudbeck’s Swedish location.*

In recent years, Gunnar Eriksson, professor emeritus of the History of Science and Ideas at Uppsala University, published the first Swedish biography of Rudbeck. He also compiled a shorter version, in English[529], that looked at Rudbeck’s 17th century ‘proofs’ that Sweden was Plato’s Atlantis. David King of the University of Kentucky has published[530] a further look at this remarkable, if eccentric, individual.

Stephen P. Kershaw has commented[1410.193]  that Rudbeck’s Atlantica ”was written while Lutheran Sweden was still coming to terms with the abdication in July 1654 of ‘Queen of the Swedes, Goths and Vandals’, and her conversion to Roman Catholicism. For the Protestant Rudbeck, the Atlantis project was part of an attempt to champion Swedish nationalism, both politically and religiously; annexing Atlantis, which the Catholic/Mediterranean world had so often used to assert its own supremacy, and moving it to Protestant Sweden was an ingenious move.”

Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite and after whom the annual Nobel Prizes are named, was a direct descendant of Rudbeck.

(a) http://www.raremaps.com/gallery/detail/0027gh/Eastern_Sweden_including_Stockholm_and_Upsala_Upsala_shown_as_Platos/Rudbeck.html

Vossius, Gerardus Johannis (I)

Gerardus Johannis Vossius (Gerrit Vos) (1577-1649) was a Dutch humanist who suggested the Holy Land as the location of Gerardus_Johannes_VossiusAtlantis. His view was that the Atlantis story was a backdrop to the patriarchal history in the Bible. Lewis Spence claimed that this idea was the result of an ‘ingenious misreading of the Pentateuch’, an accusation he leveled at other writers of that period, including Samuel Borchart and Pierre Daniel Huet..