An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Jaime Manuschevich

Israel

Israel and the Sinai Peninsula are promoted(a) as the location of Atlantis by Jaime Manuschevich. His contention is based on what he claims were the different geographical perceptions of the Egyptians and Greeks that led to Plato misinterpreting Solon’s notes and erroneously placing Atlantis in the Atlantic Ocean. He presented his radical views to the 2005 Atlantis Conference.

More tangible but no more credible is the site of Atlit-Yam of the coast of Israel, which the media insist on referring to as “Israel’s Atlantis”.

(a) http://www.radiojai.com.ar/online/notiDetalle.asp?id_Noticia=13679 (Spanish)

 

Manuschevich, Jaime (L)

Jaime Manuschevich of the University of Chile has recently produced a book in Spanish[468] that places Atlantis in what are now Israel and the Sinai Peninsula. The most dramatic part of his thesis is that at the time, 9500 BC, this region was in fact an island Manuschevichbounded on the west by a waterway roughly following the course of today’s Suez Canal and on the east by a widened Dead Sea and Jordan River with a northern outlet to the Mediterranean. Manuschevich claims that instead of thinking in terms of Atlantis sinking into the sea we should consider the possibility that the sea sank separating the Dead Sea, Mediterranean and Red Sea resulting in earlier waterways becoming impassable to voyagers. To support his theory Manuschevich cites geological and historical evidence.

He bases his views on the generally accepted fact that the earliest civilisations were to be found in the Middle East. Manuschevich wrote a paper, outlining what he perceives are geographical errors contained in Plato’s tale, for presentation to the Melos Atlantis Conference in 2005(a).

(a) http://phistoria.net/reportajes-de-historia/Parte-II:-Israel-fue-La-Atl%E1ntida_81.html (Spanish)

 

 

Holy Land (L)

The Holy Land is a term used to refer to that part of the eastern Mediterranean which the Old Testament records as having been given to the Israelites by God. It is now comprised of Israel, Palestinian territory, along with parts of Jordan and Lebanon.

The Holy Land was suggested by Serranus  in 1570 as the location of Atlantis. This idea was later echoed by  Gerardus Johannis Vossius and Carl Fredrich Baër who was Swedish, but lived in France during the 18th century. Another Swede, Johannes Eurenius also placed Atlantis in Holy Land in his 1751 book. Another 18th century scholar, Jacques Julien Bonnaud  was of the opinion[0967] that when Plato wrote about Atlantis, he was imperfectly describing the Holy Land! His book, Hérodote historien du peuple hébreu sans le savoir  is available as a free ebook(a).

In recent times a more radical view has been proposed by Professor Jaime Manuschevich who has identified modern Israel together the Sinai Peninsula as the true site of Atlantis.

(a) http://books.google.ie/books?id=QQooAAAAYAAJ&oe=UTF-8&redir_esc=y (French)

Baër, Carl Friedrich

Carl Friedrich Baër was Swedish, but lived in Paris where he was pastor at theBaer RedSea Lutheran chapel in the Swedish embassy (1742-1784). He believed that Plato’s Atlantis story was a corruption of Bible history and that in fact Atlantis was located in the Holy Land. He went further and attempted to link the twelve tribes of Israel with the ten kings of the Atlantean federation. On one of the maps in his book, first published in 1762[140], he placed the Atlas Mountains in modern Yemen and has the Red Sea named as Mare Atlanticum, presaging the more recent work of Jaime Manuschevich. Furthermore, Baër links the destruction of Atlantis with the biblical story of the demise of Sodom and Gomorrah.

His book, in French, can now be read or downloaded online(a).

(a) http://archive.org/details/essaihistoriquee00baer