An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Jürgen Spanuth

Kalweit, Holger

Holger Kalweit is a German psychotherapist and ethnologist and something of a conspiracy theorist. In his Irrstern über Atlantis[1024] (Inferno over Atlantis) he follows Spanuth in identifying Heligoland as a remnant of Atlantis, which he claims was destroyed in 1222 BC by the comet Phaëton.

He sees Atlantis as the home of the white Nordic people. After the catastrophe he believes that the survivors en masse fled south to the Mediterranean, where they settled in what was later known as the Levant and Greece. According to Kalweit they were responsible for the Hellenic culture, whose influence is still felt today.

At this point most people would think that his ideas were questionable enough, but unfortunately there was worse to come. He goes on to claim that the Nordic gods were also brought to Greece, “but, unfortunately, their gods were not human beings, but reptiloid aliens.” Anyone for therapy?

Paulsen, Peter

Peter Paulsen (1902-1985) was a German professor of archaeology, who belonged to the Ahnenerbe-SS and was heavily involved in the plundering of museums and libraries in Poland after the German invasion. Heather Pringle records his wartime activities in great detail in The Master Plan[0032.196].

He had a keen interest in Norse mythology, which led to the publication of Axt und Kreutz in 1939[1364]. So it is not surprising that after the war when Jürgen Spanuth published his theory of a North Sea Atlantis and identified the Sea Peoples as the ‘North Sea Peoples’, Paulsen was quick to describe Spanuth’s work as “very significant and valuable research which should in every way be supported.” Another former member of Ahnenerbe, Professor Otto Huth is also recorded[1339.217] by Felix R. Paturi as supporting Spanuth’s work.

Elsewhere(a) we are told After the war Peter Paulsen did his best to bury his past and in 1981 landed a prestigious job as a medieval expert in Würtemberg”.

(a) http://ahnen.greyfalcon.us/ahnen2.html

Paturi, Felix R.

paturiFelix R. Paturi is the pseudonym of German author Heinz Mindt (1940- ), whose work includes Prehistoric Heritage[1339],  in which he touches on the subject of Atlantis[p215], in particular the theories of Jürgen Spanuth. Although he does not expressly endorse the idea of the reality of Atlantis he is very critical of the manner in which Spanuth was treated by some members of the scientific community, which resulted in ten professors being forced, in a law court, to admit that their arguments against Spanuth were untenable. Paturi also includes references to some scientists who did support Spanuth. He concludes with the following comment – “But independent of whether the mysterious sea peoples were or were not the inhabitants of Plato’s Atlantis, there is one thing which in the long run can scarcely be denied: that they came from the far north.”

Horned Helmets

Horned Helmets have been worn by various warrior groups from ancient times but , in spite of popular belief, not by the Vikings. Jürgen Spanuth, the leading proponent of a North Sea Atlantis, has identified the Sea Peoples who attacked the Egyptians as North Sea Peoples. The attack was recorded by the Egyptians on the walls of Medinet Habu and where they depicted some of the invaders with horned helmets. Spanuth claimed that “The only known Bronze Age horned helmets come from north Europe”[0015.55]. The illustrations from the Danish National Museum used by Spanuth[0015.31] were more likely to have been for ceremonial use and show no signs of having been used in battle.*A January 2018 article highlights a horned figure on the so-called Oseberg Tapestry, who appears to be leading a religious procession, contributing to the theory that the few horned helmets found so far were probably used for ceremonial purposes(e). Another textile fragment found at the same site also depicts a horned person, which to my mind is more reminiscent of a nordic shaman than a warrior.*

It is noteworthy that the ‘Gjermundbu Helmet’, discovered in 1943 in Nazi-occupied Norway, is the only helmet documented to have existed during the Viking period and is clearly hornless(d).

Furthermore, he was incorrect in claiming that horned helmets were only used in northern Europe during the Bronze Age. Archaeologist Roger Grosjean (1920-1975) has demonstrated(a) that the Torreans of Corsica did use such helmets during that period. The Sherden/Shardana, considered to be one of the Sea Peoples depicted at Medinet Habu are shown as wearing horned helmets and in every instance, except three, they include a round additional piece on the crest. The Shardana are generally accepted to be from Sardinia and are possibly related to the Torreans on neighbouring Corsica. However, the Sardinian examples do not appear to have the accoutrement at the helmets’ crest depicted at Medinet Habu.

Andrea Salimbeti’s website(b) devoted to the Greek Bronze Age has a section on the helmets used in the Aegean during that period, which depicts some horned helmets used by the Mycenaeans(c).

In conclusion, I think Spanuth’s horned helmet evidence is flawed but also that the Sardinian theory is not watertight. Furthermore, his core claim of an invasion from the North Sea into the Eastern Mediterranean is equally untenable. Bronze Age territorial expansion was always into adjacent or nearby territory. A journey of over 4,000 miles from Heligoland to attack Egypt makes no sense.

(a) https://medium.com/the-bronze-age/the-mysterious-horned-warrior-torreans-of-the-isle-of-corsica-853b5e98c677

(b)  http://www.salimbeti.com/micenei/index.htm

(c) http://www.salimbeti.com/micenei/helmets1.htm (Also see helmets2 & helmets3)

(d) https://thornews.com/2014/06/07/why-is-this-the-only-existing-viking-age-helmet/

*(e) https://thornews.com/2018/01/11/the-confusing-horned-helmets-depicted-in-the-oseberg-viking-age-tapestries/*

Lock, John (L)

John Lock is presented as the ‘author’ of The Mystery of Atlantis[1089]. The book is very badly presented with strange formatting, many page numbers missing, no title page etc, etc. It was published by CreateSpace, an Amazon company.

As I read through the book, there small hints that it was written decades before the publication date of 2015. The content of the book supported the North Sea as the location of Atlantis, a concept given great exposure in the 1950’s by Jürgen Spanuth (1907-1998). Further investigation revealed that the text was word for word taken from Spanuth’s Atlantis:The Mystery Unravelled[0017] which in turn was the English translation of Das Entraselte Atlantis (Atlantis Revealed)[0016]. It is obvious that the text was just badly scanned, resulting in the poor formatting, numerous typos and missing images.

This is the most blatant case of printed plagiarism that I have encountered, which may also be a breach of copyright.

Reader’s Digest (L)

Reader’s Digest published The World’s Last Mysteries[1083] in 1977. The very first article, written by May Reader's DigestVeber, was about Atlantis. She reviews the leading Atlantis theories of nearly four decades ago; Azores, Bimini and in greater detail, Minoan Thera. One of her final comments was that “even the impressive body of scientific evidence which supports the Santorini explanation has been challenged. There is a volume of scholarship building up in favour of Heligoland as the site of Atlantis.” This was two years before Spanuth‘s Atlantis of the North[0015] was published in English!

Joramo, Morten Alexander (L)

Morten JoramoMorten Alexander Joramo is a Norwegian astrologer, musician and author. In his 2011 book, The Homer Code[1075], he is heavily influenced by Felice Vinci, who situated Homer’s Odyssey in the northern European region. Joramo specifically identifies the island of Trenyken, in Norway’s Outer Lofoten Islands, with Homer‘s legendary Thrinacia. He also refers to the work of Iman Wilkens and Jürgen Spanuth. He also introduces the Bock Saga in support of his contention that “that there must have been an advanced culture in the high north thousands of years ago.”(a)

Although the author touches on the subject of Atlantis in The Homer Code he expands more fully on it the following year in Atlantis Unveiled[1076]. In it he again follows much of Vinci’s work as well as Spanuth’s identification of Helgoland as the location of Atlantis. He also uses Homer as well as copious extracts from Apollonius of Rhodes to justify his identification of Northern Europe as the backdrop to both the Odyssey and Plato’s Atlantis narrative.

Up to this point I found his work interesting, if not convincing. However, when I got to his ancient alien conspiracy theory and the use magic mushrooms, I cried halt.

In 2015, Joramo published The Lost Civilization of the North[1170], which is intended to supplant Atlantis Unveiled.

(a) http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11337705-the-homer-code

(b) http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22156233-atlantis-unveiled

Behrends, Arno (L)

Arno Behrends is the author of Nordsee-Atlantis[942] which offers an example of the most recent support for the theories of Jürgen Spanuth. In addition to the arguments of Spanuth’s he adds the modern commentators on Homer’s Odyssey, such as Felice Vinci, who have advanced the idea that Homer’s story originated in northern Europe, which enhances the possibility that Plato’s narrative came from the same source!

Stender, Walter

Walter_Stender

Walter Stender (1905-2000) was a Latvian aero engineer who lived and worked most of his life in Germany. He had a variety of interests that included Atlantis. He was attracted to Spanuth’s theories and wrote a widely regarded article on Phaeton and its place in the Atlantis story 1n 1997. This is freely available online(a) and although in German, it translates reasonably well into English with the Google translator. A more extensive biography is available on the Atlantisforschung.de website(b).

*(a) http://www.efodon.de/html/archiv/vorgeschichte/stender/phaeton.htm (link broken Dec. 2018)*

(b)  http://atlantisforschung.de/index.php?title=Walter_Stender

 

 

 

Kramer, Andre (t)

André Kramer is a researcher who is a regular contributor to the German website Mysteria 3000. He has written a booklet on the megalithic monuments of Schleswig-Holstein(a) . In an article(b) on Mysteria 3000 he identifies the Sea Peoples as Atlanteans and in a further article(c) he discusses rock carvings of elephants and giraffes in Scandinavia and their relationship to the theories of Jürgen Spanuth. (The Google translation is not very good)

(a)  http://www.mckie.de/JAAS/schlsw/schalenstein_akramer.html  (German)

(b) http://www.mysteria3000.de/2011/atlantis-ein-kausalitatsproblem-oder-alles-eine-frage-des-motivs/

(c) http://www.mysteria3000.de/2012/spanuth-und-die-elefantenritzungen-von-tanum/