An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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lunar years

Manetho

Manetho of Sebennytos in the Nile Delta was an Egyptian priest and historian who flourished in the 3rd century BC. He produced a significant history of Egypt in three volumes, Aegyptiaca[1373.40], but unfortunately only fragments have survived(b).

His lists of Egyptian kings continue to be used as one of the pillars of Egyptian chronology. Interestingly, he would seem to claim that the earliest of the kings ruled in a foreign land. This has been taken by some, such as R. Cedric Leonard, to mean Atlantis(a).

Also relevant is that Manetho wrote of the ancient Egyptians counting time in months rather than years  – The year I take, however, to be a lunar one, consisting, that is, of 30 days: what we now call a month the Egyptians used formerly to style a year.”

*(a) http://www.atlantisquest.com/Hiero.html  (offline March 2018)*

(b) http://www.jasoncolavito.com/manetho.html

Malaise, Dr. René Edmond

Dr. René Malaise (1892-1978) was a Swedish entomologist, at the Riks Museum in Stockholm, who is famous for the invention of the ‘Malaise trap’ for collecting insect specimens.

He wrote[461] about the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its connection with  Atlantis. Malaise was dismissive of Alfred Wegener’s theories, preferring the idea of landbridges rather than continental drift as the explanation for the existence of matching flora and fauna on both sides of the Atlantic. This view was expressed in a 1972 booklet, Land-bridges or Continental Drift[1455].

He supported the 1934 ‘constriction hypothesis’ of the paleozoologist, Nils H. Odhner, which attributed vertical crustal movement to ocean temperature change rather than isostasy.

He contended[462][463] that at least parts of the Ridge were exposed during the last Ice Age and that the fossilised remains of freshwater diatoms found submerged on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are evidence that the exposed Ridge contained freshwater lakes. Malaise believed that the Azores are remnants of Atlantis.

Malaise was also convinced that Atlantis probably traded with Egyptian colonists in England, who were responsible for Stonehenge! (Sykes’ Atlantean Research, Oct/Nov 1949)

He has also argued in a 1973 booklet, Atlantis: A Verified Myth[464] that the similarity of arrowheads found on both sides of the Atlantic point to a common ancestry, possibly on an Atlantic Atlantis. He further suggested that Atlantis had an important trading centre at the mouth of the River Elbe.

In his 1951 offering Atlantis en Geologisk Verklighet[461] he included a number of maps illustrating his contention that Atlantis was submerged over a long protracted period of time.

Malaise supported the idea that Plato was referring to lunar ‘years’ when he spoke of 9,000 years being the time between the war with Atlantis and Solon’s visit to Egypt. Malaise believed that Atlantis finally disappeared in the 13th/12th century BC.

Dale Drinnon offers an extensive review(a) of Malaise and his theories.

Malaise had ideas that may appear very dated today, but in the light of scientific knowledge of his day, his conclusions were as valid as any other. In the same way new ideas today, based on what we know now, will appear equally antiquated fifty years from now. Every age repeats the mistake of thinking that it has reached the pinnacle of scientific understanding.

The excellent Atlantisforschung.de website has a more comprehensive article on the work of Malaise(b).

(a) http://frontiers-of-anthropology.blogspot.com/2011/06/rene-malaise-and-geological-reality-of.html (link broken July 2018) See: https://web.archive.org/web/20170412182131/http://frontiers-of-anthropology.blogspot.com/2011/06/rene-malaise-and-geological-reality-of.html

(b) http://atlantisforschung.de/index.php?title=Dr._Ren%C3%A9_Malaise

 

Zárate, Agustín de (a)

Agustín de Zárate (1514-1560) was a Spanish accountant who travelled to the Indies in 1543. He then spent a year in Peru supporting Gonzalo Pizarro’s rebellion against the Spanish crown. As a consequence he was imprisoned for treason on his return to Spain. While in prison he wrote a history of Peru, Historia del descubrimiento y conquista de las provincias del Peru (Seville, 1577), in which he compared the customs of the Peruvian natives with Plato’s description of the Atlanteans and concluded that the Peruvians had migrated from Atlantis.

Zárate was aware that Plato’s reference to 9,000 years gave it the superficial appearance of a fable and consequently notes that “according to Eudoxus these were not solar years but lunar ‘years’ as calculated by the Egyptian calendar. Therefore the time was 9,000 months or 750 years.”