An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Nineveh

Millette, Louis

Louis Millette, is a Canadian commentator who claims to have identified the location of Atlantis in the region of the Guadalquivir River in Spain’s Andalusia, maintaining that Tartessos, Tarshish and Atlantis were all the same. He has posted a set of three satellite image(d) to support his contention, unfortunately, I cannot see anything that might be related to Atlantis. His brief video clip(e) is equally uninformative.

However, Millette is a firm believer in extraterrestrial visitors(a), which for me is sufficient reason to consider him an unreliable researcher. He also claims to have located the ‘Hanging Gardens of Babylon’ in Nineveh, an idea already proposed by Stephanie Dailey of Oxford University as early as 1992(c).

Millette promises startling revelations regarding Stonehenge in June 2015!

(a) http://www.ancient-origins.net/unexplained-phenomena/ancient-history-ufos-and-unclassified-document-oppenheim-and-einstein-001384

(c) http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130531-babylon-hanging-gardens-nineveh-seven-wonders/

(d) http://yourshot.nationalgeographic.com/profile/332999/ #

(e) http://youtu.be/LvrW_Jwintc

Vineta

Vineta was a legendary city on the Baltic in what is now the German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. The city was destroyed when it sank into the sea and thought by some to be the source of the Atlantis story. It is reputed to have existed near the north German city of Barth.

vinetakarteIt was considered to be the most important trading city in Europe with links as far as the Mediterranean. The Arabic writer Ibrahim Ibn Yaqub described it (c. 970) as “a large city by the ocean with twelve gates, the greatest of all cities in Europe, farthest north-west in the country of Misiko (Poland) in the marshes by the ocean”.(a)

Doris Manner has written a book[466] on the subject and also has a website(b), which is available in German and English. She courageously identifies Atlantis with Vineta, Titans with Teutons and Vineta, in the past referred to as Niniveta, with the Nineveh of the Bible.

A more conventional history of the lost Baltic city is offered by Ingrid & P.Werner Lange in their Vineta, Atlantis des Nordens (Vineta: Atlantis of the North)[1125]..

*The excellent German website, Atlantisforschung.de, offers further information about Manner’s work.(d)

(a) http://marebalticum.natmus.dk/vinetaUK.asp?ID=29 (offline) See: https://web.archive.org/web/20120204201941/http://marebalticum.natmus.dk/vinetaUK.asp?ID=29

(b) https://www.atlantis-niniveta.de/    *

(d) http://atlantisforschung.de/index.php?title=Atlantis_lag_an_der_deutschen_Ostseek%C3%BCste (German)

Ninus, King

King Ninus is frequently attributed as the builder of Nin-eveh, in which his name is preserved. Nineveh, is today encircled by the modern city of Mosul in Iraq and is reputed to have been the largest city in the world 2,700 years ago.

Controversially, Nineveh has recently been claimed(a) as the true location of the legendary “Hanging Gardens” rather than Babylon as a result of an earlier mistranslation!*A more radical idea has come from Constantinos Ragazas, who insists that Göbekli Tepe is the site of the Hanging Gardens(d)!

He is also sometimes identified with the biblical Nimrod (Nimrud), Zoroaster(b), while Alexander Hislop in The Two Babylons[1135] equates Ninus with Tammuz, Osiris, Adonis and Bacchus(c).

Ninus’ wife, Semiramis, who reputedly succeeded him to the throne of Assyria, is remembered in legends throughout the Middle East.

Anton Mifsud has used the reign of Ninus as an anchor for his preferred date for the destruction of Atlantis of around 2200 BC. He points out[209] that Eumelos of Cyrene dated the demise of Plato’s island to the reign of Ninus and links this with the calculation of the Roman historian Aemilius Sura (2nd cent. BC)  who placed the reign of Ninus around 2192 BC.*A number of other authorities attribute similar dates to his reign as recorded by John Jackson in volume one of his 1752 Chronological Antiquities[1555.251].*

David Rohl, a leading advocate for a radical revision of the accepted chronology of the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East, identifies Nimrod as the great grandson of Noah and goes further with a claim[230] that he was also known as Enmerkar, King of Uruk, and places his reign around 2900 BC. On the other hand The American Encyclopaedia opts for a date circa 1230 BC.

(a) http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130531-babylon-hanging-gardens-nineveh-seven-wonders/

(b) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninus

(c) http://philologos.org/__eb-ttb/sect221.htm

(d) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271076011_The_Hanging_Gardens_of_Gobekli_Tepe