An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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North Pole

Evola, Julius

Julius Evola (1898-1974) was an Italian philosopher and although he was politically right-wing in his views, he did not formally join the National Fascist Party. However, when Italy surrendered to the Allies in September 1943, he moved to Germany where he worked as a researcher for the SS Ahnenerbe.

According to Evola in his Rivolta contro il mondo modern[1326], , he claimed that the Atlanteans were Hyperboreans, Nordic supermen, who originated at the North Pole. It has been noted that many of his ideas regarding prehistory are closely related to Theosophy(b). This book has been translated into English[1327] and is available online.

According to Evola in his Revolt Against the Modern World (1934), he claimed that the Atlanteans were Hyperboreans, Nordic supermen, who originated at the North Pole.

The New York Times of February 10th 2017(c) has, worryingly, identified racist Evola as a possible influence on the thinking of Stephen K. Bannon, one of Donald Trump’s top advisors.

There is a website dedicated to his work(a).

(a) http://www.juliusevola.net/

(b) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Evola

(c) https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/10/world/europe/bannon-vatican-julius-evola-fascism.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=b-lede-package-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&mtrref=www.nytimes.com&_r=2

 

Kuntze, Otto

Otto Kuntze (1843-1907) was a renowned German botanist who wondered about the distributionOttoKuntze of the banana and arrived at the odd conclusion that the banana was brought to America when the North Pole had a tropical climate(a)! However, Ignatius Donnelly decided to modify Kuntze’s ideas and speculated on whether it was “more reasonable to suppose that the plantain, or banana, was cultivated by the people of Atlantis, and carried by their civilized colonies to the east and the west?”

(a) http://www.sacred-texts.com/earth/pf/pf13.htm

Bailly, Jean Silvain

 

Jean Silvain Bailly (1736-1793) was born in Paris and became a renowned astronomer, in which capacity he computed an orbit for Halley’s Comet and studied the four satellites of Jupiter that were then known to science.

He was a frienXIR191372 Jean-Sylvain Bailly (1736-93) 1789 (oil on canvas) by Mosnier, Jean Laurent (1743/4-1808) oil on canvas Musee de la Ville de Paris, Musee Carnavalet, Paris, France Giraudon French, out of copyrightd of the famous mathematician Laplace and also of Voltaire to whom he wrote his Letters on Atlantis published in 1778. In 2011, the British Library published a facsimile copy of the two volumes of the ‘Letters’ of the 1801 English translation by James Jacque of which letter #23 relates to Atlantis[926]. A modern English translation of letter #23 by Pierre Beaudry is available online(b).

In it, Bailly proposed that the region around Spitzbergen in the Arctic Sea was the location of Atlantis; an idea allegedly supported by Voltaire. Bailly also identified Iceland as Ogygia! Bailly’s view was based on a study of Nordic and Middle Eastern mythologies and his conclusions were similar to the theory of his contemporary Buffon who had suggested that the Earth had originally an interior fire that gradually cooled. While this fire burned the northern latitudes were much warmer providing an ideal environment in which Atlantis could flourish. When the fire cooled the Atlanteans moved south. Bailly suggested that this migration brought them to Mongolia*and from there to the Caucasus and finally to Phoenicia.*

Jean Baptiste Delambre was subsequently to attack the pseudo-scientific theories of Bailly, but while doing so, inadvertently misinterpreted some of Isaac Causabon’s commentary on Strabo, inferring that Aristotle rejected the existence of Plato’s Atlantis. This error was adopted by later writers and gained such widespread uncritical acceptance that this view of Aristotle became ‘received wisdom’. Thorwald C. Franke has now endeavoured to redress that situation with his 2012 book Aristotle and Atlantis[880].

Bailly got caught up in the turmoil of the French Revolution and eventual died after a kiss on the neck from Madame Guillotine. His ideas regarding Atlantis were ignored until Helena Blavatsky integrated some of his concepts into her theosophical musings. This amalgam of Bailly’s and Blavatsky’s beliefs were incorporated into the thinking of the German Thule Society who supported Adolf Hitler(a).

Around Blavatsky’s time in 1885 Dr W. F. Warren published a book, Paradise Found[078] that also proposed that the beginnings of the human race started at the North Pole and had been inundated at the time of the Deluge.

In 1996, Joscelyn Godwin published his Arktos[789] in which he surveys the place of “the Polar Myth in science, symbolism and Nazi survival.” 

(a)  http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/sociopol_vril08.htm

(b) http://amatterofmind.org/Pierres_PDFs/ANCIENT_ASTRONOMY_II/BOOK_III/2._BAILLY’S_LETTERS_ON_PLATO’S_ATLANTIS.pdf

 

Warren, William Fairfield

Rev. Dr. William Fairfield Warren (1833-1929) was a professor of systematic theology and first president of Boston University and a member of a number of learned societies. In 1885 he published a work[078] in which he advanced the idea of the North Pole having held the cradle of the human race and that it was submerged in The Deluge. His book also touches on the possibility of a Pole Shift.

Warren’s book can now be accessed on-line(a) , where a review of it, is also available(b) .

Incidentally, it is recorded that a Rev. W. F. Warren presided at the wedding of ‘Wild Bill’ Hickock to Agnes Lake between 1869 and 1872!

*Jason Colavito reviewed Warren’s book over a century later, in which he also notes that the British Prime Minister and Homeric scholar, William Gladstone, already a fan of Ignatius Donnelly was supportive of some of Warren’s ideas (c).*

Bal Gangadar Tilak, an Indian independence campaigner, was so impressed by Warren’s ideas that in his own book, Arctic Home in the Vedas, he chose to locate the lost Paradise of Airyana Vaejo in the Arctic.

More recently, Professor Sergey Teleguin has again drawn attention to Tilak’s work that identifies elements in the Mayan Popul Vuh that suggest that its origins were in the far north, in Ultima Thule. He concludes with the thought that perhaps the Indo-European and Mayan ancestors came from the true North Pole. Teleguin’s article although originally in Russian, was published, in Spanish, on an Argentinian website.

Teleguin has written more extensively on a possible Arctic origin for civilisation in his 2011 book, Hyperborea – The Sacred Birthplace of Humanity: Scientific Reference Book (Russian).

(a) http://www.sacred-texts.com/earth/pf/index.htm

*(b) http://publicdomainreview.org/2012/09/06/the-last-great-explorer-william-f-warren-and-the-search-for-eden/

(c) http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/was-the-garden-of-eden-at-the-north-pole*