An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis
Search

Recent Updates

Peter de Roo

Allen, J.M.

J.M. Allen, a Scotsman, worked in the 1970’s as an expert in satellite mapping with the British Royal Air Force. He was also a researcher of ancient measuring systems. The combination of these two interests led to a Jim Allenconviction that Plato’s Atlantis could be matched with a site in the Altiplano of Bolivia,which he outlined in his book Atlantis: The Andes Solution[0040].  Coincidentally, in the same year, Tony Morrison published an article entitled The Bolivian Atlantis(k-n).

Allen’s case is primarily based on the discovery of a vast canal network in the region together with aerial photography indicating concentric rings on the ground. His chosen site of Pampa Aullagus contains red, white and black rock reminiscent of the Atlantean masonry described by Plato.

In a TV documentary that focused on his theory it was suggested that the other nine kingdoms that comprised the Atlantean domain were probably to be found in South America.

Allen has also written Decoding Ezekiel’s Temple(a), which discusses ancient measuring methods.

In 2008 Allen delivered three papers to the 2nd Atlantis Conference[750] in Athens. All three papers are available online in pdf format(g)(h)(i).

2009 saw the publication of a second book, Atlantis: Lost Kingdom of the Andes[207] designed to reinforce his original thesis of Atlantis on the Altiplano of Bolivia. A trilogy was completed in 2010 with the publication of The Atlantis Trail (Kindle)which records his travels in the Andes in search of Atlantis(b). A small hotel is now being built in Pampa Aullagus to cater for increased number of tourists, no doubt in response to the work of Jim Allen.

In 2012, Allen published Atlantis and the Persian Empire, which is available to download as a free pdf file(c). This work is really just a reprise of his earlier writings. In this somewhat provocatively titled book he claims that Plato took the geography of the Atlantis story from the Andes, a theme he has been promoting since 1998.

However, he also maintains that the military history in Plato’s narrative was based on the war between Athens and the Persian Empire in the 5th century BC. Another of his more exotic claims is that the Sea Peoples were from South America. Allen devotes a considerable part of the book to ancient South American metrology and ends with a comparison of relative merits of the Altiplano versus Santorini as the inspiration behind Plato’s Atlantis story.

An extensive critique of Allen’s theories is offered by Timothy J.Stephany on his website(e). Nevertheless, although I consider Allen’s basic theory regarding Atlantis unacceptable, I find that part of his website showing images(f) of an extensive range of artifacts demonstrate most eloquently that South American civilisation was heavily influenced by distant cultures, both east and west.

Support for Allen’s views has continued into 2013(d), despite those elements that still conflict with Plato’s narrative: dating, dimensions and the improbability of an invasion of the eastern Mediterranean by a force from the west coast South America! However, I have found that in 1900, Peter de Roo devoted chapter seven of his History of America before Columbus[890.v1] to a review of the idea that at various times native Americans travelled eastward and among other things were responsible for the settling of Egypt!

Allen’s site offers an extensive article on the life and research of Posnansky, including excerpts from his work(j).

(a)  http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/atlantisboliviapart1.htm

(b) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/theatlantistrail.htm

*(c) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/boliviaandthesumerianconnection.htm*

(d) http://beforeitsnews.com/beyond-science/2013/03/atlantis-in-south-america-the-evidence-2441492.html

(e) http://timothystephany.com/atlantis.html    

(f) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/artefacts.htm

(g) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/athensfullpaper.pdf

(h)  http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/athensfullpaper2.pdf

(i) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/athensfullpaper3.pdf

(j) http://www.atlantisbolivia.org/posnansky.htm

(k) http://www.southamericanpictures.com/features/feat4/atlantis.html

(l) http://www.southamericanpictures.com/features/feat4/dawn.html

(m) http://www.southamericanpictures.com/features/feat4/atlantis1.html

(n) http://www.southamericanpictures.com/features/feat4/dawn1.html

 

Fortunate Isles (L)

Fortunate Isles or Isles of the Blest is a term that has been applied to many islands over the ages but has been consistently described as being ‘in the west’. It is most commonly believed that the term was originally used to describe the Canary Islands, which in turn are considered by many to be remnants of Atlantis.

Marinus of Tyre, writing around 120 AD wrote of the Fortunate Isles as the western boundary of the known world and he was followed by Claudius Ptolemy (90-168 AD) who used the Fortunate Islands as the prime meridian for his Geographia(a) . However, although there is a general acceptance that the Canaries should be considered the Fortunate Isles, Ptolemy’s prime meridian runs more closely to the Cape Verde Islands!

Peter de Roo identifies Madeira and the Canaries as the Fortunate Islands in a map in his 1900 book History of America before Columbus[0890]..

Macaronesia which is derived from the Greek meaning ‘islands of the fortunate’ is a modern geographical term used to collectively describe the islands of Madeira, Azores, Canaries, Cape Verde and the Savage Islands. The term ‘Fortunate Isles’  is also applied to the Scilly Isles off the coast of Cornwall.

See:  HesperidesEugene Pégot-Ogier

(a) http://www.ing.iac.es/PR/lapalma/history.html