An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis
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Red-Haired People

Red-Haired people constitute 1-2% of the human population and are today to be found most frequently in northern and western Europe with their greatest numbers in Scotland.

In the very distant past, red hair has been depicted in ancient Egypt, red-haired people have been featured in the mythologies of both the Americas, where many red-haired mummies have been found. 4,000-year-old red-haired Caucasian mummies have been found as far as western China, highlighted by Elizabeth Wayland Barber in The Mummies of Ürümchi[1350].

A website(d) dedicated to the subject of red hair has some strange stories to relate including the claim(e) that red hair is evidence of an Atlantean Diaspora!

Lara Lamberti, the French actress and author, has written a series of articles(a,b,c) in which she endeavours to link a red-haired race with Atlantis!

(a) http://www.messagetoeagle.com/the-red-haired-race-and-the-atlantean-connection/

(b) http://www.messagetoeagle.com/redhairedgiantsatlantis_part2.php#.WDVj_cto1ow

(c) http://www.messagetoeagle.com/redhairedgiantsatlantis_part3.php#.WDVisMto1ow

(d) http://www.themythsandhistoryofredhair.co.uk/index.html

(e) http://www.themythsandhistoryofredhair.co.uk/aliensatlantis.html

Mutton, Karen (L)

Karen Mutton is a Australian writer(a) who has written books and articles on a range of ‘alternative’ or ‘fringe’ subjects. Her 2009 book, Sunken karen mutton Realms[952], is a comprehensive examination of known sunken cities, harbours and roads. Included in her survey are crannogs, which are artificial islands constructed in lakes. She refers to the crannogs of Scotland, ignoring the Irish examples which total around 1,200 or nearly three times the Scottish number.

She devotes a somewhat disproportionate amount of space to an extensive review of Atlantis theories, without offering anything new. Google Books have a considerable amount of this book online(b).

(a) http://karen-mutton.com/

(b) http://books.google.ie/books?id=6bFE-dQPO34C&pg=PT233&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=3#v=onepage&q&f=false

Vinci, Felice

Felice Vinci (1946- ) is an Italian nuclear engineer with a background in Latin and Greek studies Felice_Vinciand is a member of MENSA, Italy. It is his belief that Greek mythology had its origins in Northern Europe.

His first book on the subject in 1993, Homericus Nuncius[1358], was subsequently expanded into Omero nel Baltico[0018] and published in 1995.and has now been translated into most of the languages of the Baltic as well as an English version with the title of The Baltic Origins of Homer’s Epic Tales[0019]. The foreword was written by Joscelyn Godwin.

He offers a compelling argument for re-reading Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey with the geography of the Baltic rather than the Mediterranean as a guide.A synopsis of his research is available on the Internet(a).

His book has had positive reviews from a variety of commentators(j). Understandably, Vinci’s theory is not without its critics whose views can also be found on the internet(d)(b).and in particular I wish to draw attention to one extensive review which is quite critical(k).

Stuart L. Harris has written a number of articles for the Migration and Diffusion website(c) including a number specifying a Finnish location for Troy following a meeting with Vinci in Rome. M.A. Joramo was also influenced by Vinci’s work and has placed the backdrop to Homer’s epic works to northern European regions, specifically identifying the island of Trenyken, in Norway’s Outer Lofoten Islands, with Homer’s legendary Thrinacia.

Jürgen Spanuth based his Atlantis theory[015] on an unambiguous identification of the Atlanteans with the Hyperboreans of the Baltic region. As a corollary to his own theory, Vinci feels that the Atlantis story should also be reconsidered with a northern European origin at its core. He suggests that an island existed in the North Sea between Britain and Denmark during the megalithic period that may have been Plato’s island. He also makes an interesting observation regarding the size of Atlantis when he points out that ‘for ancient seafaring peoples, the ‘size’ of an island was the length of its coastal perimeter, which is roughly assessable by circumnavigating it’. Consequently, Vinci contends that when Plato wrote of Atlantis being ‘greater’ than Libya and Asia together he was comparing the perimeter of Atlantis with the ‘coastal length’ of Libya and Asia.

Malena Lagerhorn, a Swedish novelist, has written two books, in English, entitled Ilion [1546] and Heracles [1547] , which incorporate much of Vinci’s theories into her plots(l).

Not content with moving the geography of Homer and Plato to the Baltic, Vinci has gone further and transferred[1178]  the biblical Garden of Eden to the same region(e).

A 116 bullet-pointed support for Vinci from a 2007 seminar, “Toija and the roots of European civilization” has been published online(h). In 2012 John Esse Larsen published a book[1048] expressing similar views.

Vinci.Eden An extensive 2014 audio recording of an interview with Vinci on Red Ice Radio is available online(f). It is important to note that Vinci is not the first to situate Homer’s epics in the Atlantic, northern Europe and even further afield. Henriette Mertz has Odysseus wandering across the Atlantic, while Iman Wilkens also gives Odysseus a trans-Atlantic voyage and just as controversially locates Homer’s Troy in England[610]. Edo Nyland has linked the story of Odysseus with Bronze Age Scotland[394].

Christine Pellech has daring proposed in a 2011 book[0640], that the core narrative in Homer’s Odyssey is a description of the circumnavigation of the globe in a westerly direction(i). These are just a few of the theories promoting a non-Mediterranean backdrop to the Illiad and Odyssey. Obviously they cannot all be correct and probably all are wrong. Many have been seduced by their novelty rather than their provability. For my part I will, for now, stick with the more mundane and majority view that Homer wrote of events that took place mainly in the central and eastern Mediterranean. Armin Wolf offers a valuable overview of this notion(g).

(a) http://www.centrostudilaruna.it/felicevincilocationoftroy.html

(b) http://mythopedia.info/Vinci-review.pdf

(c) http://www.migration-diffusion.info/article.php?authorid=113

(d) http://homergeography.blogspot.ie/

(e) http://thule-italia.com/wordpress/il-paradiso-indoeuropeo-e-il-giardino-delleden/?lang=en

(f) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6QPtcZWBPs

(g) http://www.ine-notebooks.org/index.php/te/article/viewPDFInterstitial/119/175

(h) http://www.slideshare.net/akela64/1-aa-toija-2007-English

(i) http://www.migration-diffusion.info/books.php

*(j) http://www.migration-diffusion.info/article.php?id=44*

(k) http://www.paabo.ca/reviews/BalticHomericVinci.html

(l) http://www.ilionboken.se

Steuerwald, Hans (L)

Hans Steuerwald is another unconventional German writer who favours the idea of the capital of Atlantis being located on the Celtic Shelf near Penzance in Cornwall. This he expressed in his 1983 book, Der Untergang von Atlantis (The Fall of Atlantis)[564], in which he also dated its demise to 1240 BC.

He has also supported[565] the idea that Homer’s Odysseus (Roman Ulysses} visited Scotland on his famous travels.