An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Sprague deCamp

Lynch, George

George LynchGeorge Lynch (1868-1928) was listed by Sprague deCamp[0194.329] as a supporter of a Brazilian Atlantis in 1925. Until recently, that was all that I could find about him. However, I discovered that Stelios Pavlou had unearthed much more information.

Lynch was an Irish war correspondent, reporting on conflicts such as the Spanish-American War, the Boer War and the Chinese Boxer Rebellion* and recounted in his Impressions of a War Correspondent [1639].*

Towards the end of his life, Lynch was a fund-raiser for Percy Fawcett’s expedition to find the lost city of ‘Z’ in Brazil, which, apparently, they both believed to have a possible connection with Atlantis.

 

Cazeau & Scott (L)

Charles J. Cazeau & Stuart D. Scott, Jnr were Associate Professors of Geology and Anthropology respectively at Buffalo’s State University of New York. They are the authors of Exploring the Unknown[0878], in which they rationally examine some of the mysteries that have been most popular with the general public.

Naturally, Atlantis features in this collection with a review of some of the best known theories. However, the authors seemed constrained by Sprague deCamp’s warning[0194] that “you cannot change all the details of Plato’s story and still claim to have Plato’s story.” Consequently, they have accepted Plato’s very early date for the demise of Atlantis in spite of the fact that it conflicts with both archaeology and commonsense.

The result is that Caseau & Scott concluded that the Atlantis narrative includes a distorted memory of the global flooding that followed the last Ice Age.

d’Eraines, Jean (L)

Jean d’Eraines was the author of the 1914 book, Le probleme des origines et des migrations[1056], in which, according to Sprague deCamp, he identified the Arctic as the home of Atlantis. The original French text is available online(a). I note that he was not mentioned in Joscelyn Godwin’s Arktos and has also been accused of being pseudo-scientific(b).

(a) http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6571245x.r=.langES

(b) http://baal-ammon.livejournal.com/232554.html

Pollet, Marcel

Marcel Pollet (1883-1961) was a French musical composer who has written for the cinema as well as operatic works. He is possibly the same person that Sprague deCamp lists as suggesting in 1923 that Atlantis had been situated in the Low Countries (Belgium & Holland).

The Shadow of Atlantis (m)

The Shadow of Atlantis [156] , by Col. Alexander Braghine, was in its day well received but now would be considered fairly standard fare. Braghine promotes the idea of Atlantis being situated in the Atlantic and like Donnelly draws on the apparent cultural connections between the Americas and the Old World to support this belief.

*[Sprague deCamp, an Atlantis sceptic, lists[0194] a series of errors in Braghine’s book, finishing with the ominous remark that ‘you believe Colonel Braghine at your peril.’ Another critical review written in 1940 can be read online(b). You can contrast this with the reviews on Amazon.com(a).

Totally unrelated is a children’s book of the same name by Wendy Leighton-Porter.

(a) https://www.amazon.com/Shadow-Atlantis-Braghine/dp/1494077876

(b) http://www.unz.org/Pub/SaturdayRev-1940may18-00018?View=PDF]*