An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Templars

Charpentier, Louis (m)

Louis_CharpentierLouis Charpentier (1905-1979) was a French journalist with a fascination for the mysteries of ancient history. He has written books on the Basques and the Templars,*[the latter were considered by Charpentier to have built Chartres Cathedral as a repository for ancient wisdom.]*

In 1975 he produced a paper in which he speculated on the existence of Atlantis and concluded that it probably existed as a Cro-Magnon society on an island in the Atlantic that was destroyed by the Deluge.

Carnac, Pierre

Pierre Carnac (1921-2008) was the pen name of Professor Doru Todericiu, a pierre carnacRomanian who has written extensively on prehistory. He retired to Normandy in France where he continued writing until his death. He has tackled subjects such as Vikings and Templars in America, early Pacific migration as well as ancient science and symbolism. In 1971 Carnac explored the Bimini Stones with Dimitri Rebikoff and concluded that they were remnants of Plato’s lost civilisation. He published a book[218] on Bimini in 1973. However, three decades were to pass before he had published another work[219], also in French,  L’Atlantide, Autopsie d’un Mythe dealing exclusively with Atlantis. In it he invokes the Egyptian Book of the Dead to demonstrate that a meteorite impact in the Atlantic destroyed Atlantis, echoing the work of Otto Muck. The attached map by Carnac shows his preferred location for Atlantis.

There is now a website dedicated to his work(a).

(a) http://users.pandora.be/kenneshugo/Website%20Pierre%20Carnac.htm

Mahieu, Jacques de

Jacques de Mahieu (1915-1990) was a French academic who spend the latter Mahieu 2part of his life teaching in Argentina. During the war he was member of the Division Charlemagne, a military unit comprised of French volunteers in the German Wehrmacht. When Paris was liberated he fled to Argentina, where he became a naturalised citizen and a professor of anthropology.

He continued to espouse Nazi writing on politics and scientific racism. Following a trip to Paraguay he announced that he had uncovered evidence of a nomadic tribe of white Indians whose ancestors had been ‘Aryans of the Nordic race’. This claim seems like an echo of the story of Colonel Braghine who reported the existence of a tribe of white natives in Venezuela.  However, both the Mahieu and Braghine reports can be seen as being supported by the recent book[630] by Richard W. Welch in which he offers evidence of very early European settlers in America.

In 1985 Mahieu published Die Flucht der Trojaner[775] in which he claimed that the Trojans were originally white Libyans who had come from Scandinavia. After the Trojan War they fled to America where they came to be known today as Olmecs!

He also wrote of a Templar geometric influence in America in his Les Templiers en Amérique (Templars in America) which is available as a pdf file in Italian and many other of his works in Spanish and French on the pdfarchive website(a).

(a) http://www.pdfarchive.info/index.php?pages/De