An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Underwater Anomalies

Underwater Anomalies

Underwater Anomalies claimed as Atlantis have been identified in recent years on Google Earth underwater anomalyimages. The one that received the most widespread attention was in the Atlantic west of the Canaries. The location in question purports to show a gridlike street system. However, the scale involved would suggest ‘streets’ half a mile wide, which even for Atlanteans would have been rather unlikely. Google updated their data with a technical explanation for the anomaly(b). However, Michael Jaye is unwilling to accept Google’s response and has described the gridlike feature to have been the Plain of Atlantis(f). A comparable site(c) near Puerto Rico has been highlighted by Deb Johnson, which can probably be explained similarly.

A slightly different type of image has been spotted in lakes in the Peruvian  Andes(d) as well as Manzanillo Bay in the Dominican Republic(e). These images of shallower waters show a range of rectangular shapes that  stop dead where they meet the shore with no continuation on land. Once again I suspect flawed processing of the scanning data.

Apart from the fact that all of the above lack any of the circular features so vividly described by Plato. It is obvious that they cannot all be Atlantis and in all probability none are. No effort has been made to match any of these anomalous images with the topographical details provided by Plato!

(a) See: https://web.archive.org/web/20160621013352/http://revoseek.com/technology/upgrade-google-earth-disappears-atlantis/

(b) http://www.livescience.com/18308-google-earth-update-erases-atlantis.html

(c) http://www.atlantismystery.com/Atlantis.jpg (offline)

(d) http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/esp_sociopol_underground23.htm

(e) http://manzanillodigital.blogspot.com/2009/12/lo-que-dice-fianchy-torres-sobre.html

(f) https://explorers.org/events/detail/nyc_public_lecture_series_feat_michael_jaye

(g) http://skeptico.blogs.com/skeptico/2009/02/atlantis-not-found-with-google-earth.html

Hispaniola

Hispaniola is the second largest island in the West Indies, containing Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Before Columbus, Hispaniola was known by the locals as Quisqueya – Mother of the Lands, sometimes spelt Kiskeya.

hispaniola

In 1794 a Guatemalan doctor and scholar, Paul Felix Cabrera, proposed that Hispaniola was Atlantis as well as a mysterious Atlantic island called Septimania. However, his theories, although revolutionary, were flawed by political bias against neighbouring Cuba.  In the mid-19th century Charles Etienne Brasseur de Bourbourg was another who proposed that Hispaniola was in fact a remnant of Plato’s Atlantis. In 1885 the American historian, Hyde Clarke, also suggested Hispaniola as a possible location.

The most recent advocate is Prof. Emilio Spedicato who proposes(a) the island as the home of Atlantis and contends that a consideration of the topography of Hispaniola suggests that the ruins of the capital city, if not completely destroyed by the catastrophic event (most probably a huge tsunami due to either an oceanic impact of a comet or an Apollo object, or to the tidal effects of a planet passing close to the Earth) lie under thick sediments in the bottom of Lake Henriquillo, close to the southern coast of Santo Domingo, near the border with Haiti.

In January 2010 an archaeologist, Fianchy Torres, claimed(b) that a site in Manzanillo Bay in the north-west of the Dominican Republic, near the Haitian border, was the location of Plato’s Atlantis(c). He based his contention on anomalies he found on Google Earth images and sea level changes. Similar underwater anomalies have been identified in Peru, near Puerto Rico as well as the Canaries, which appear to be the result of data processing errors.

The idea of Atlantis in Hispaniola, inspired by the work of Spedicato, is now supported by the Kiskeya-Atl Research Center(d), which has announced that it will host a three-day conference in November 2018, with an invited panel of “renowned scholars and researchers on the topic.”>Hervé Fanini-Lemoine, is one of the founders and current chairman of the Research Centre. Its purpose “is to research and find artifacts to sustain the hypothesis which says the lost land of Atlantis is, in fact, KU-ISH-KU-EYA, ‘Mother of Lands'”.<

(a) http://www.academia.edu/10973532/ATLANTIS_IN_HISPANIOLA_

(b)  See: https://web.archive.org/web/20110321094118/http://www.dominicancentral.com/newsarticle/the_lost_city_of_atlantis_near_dominican_coast/

(d) https://www.kiskeyaatlresearchcenter.org/index.html