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William Scott-Elliott

Bulwer-Lytton, Sir Edward (L)

Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1803–1873) was a British politician and Bulwer-Lyttonnovelist. He coined a number of phrases that are still in use today; ‘the great unwashed’, ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’ and ‘pursuit of the almighty dollar’. The last is from his 1871 science fiction novel, Vril: The Power of the Coming Race[1336], which describes an underground race of superior beings with advanced powers.

I have been reminded by Ronan Coghlan that the beef extract, Bovril, developed in the 1870’s, had used ‘vril’ as part of its name to imply ‘bull-power’!

He was adopted by English Rosicrucians as their ‘Grand Patron’. The influence of Bulwer-Lytton extended to Helena Blavatsky who “compared Vril with the sidereal force of the Atlanteans, called Mash-Mak.” (e)

William Scott-Elliott took Bulwer-Lytton’s ideas seriously and has shown their influence in his references to Atlantis. In the early part of the 20th century this fictional concept of vril was incorporated into esoteric Nazism, including the work of Brazilian right-winger, Gustavo Barosso.

Even today there is a so-called Church of Vrilology(b), which includes belief in a Black Sea location for Atlantis(c)!

On a lighter note, Bulwer-Lytton’s name has been given to a competition(d) that “challenges entrants to compose the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels.” There have been many worthy winners.

(b) http://www.vrilology.org/INDEX.HTML (offline Nov 13)

(c) http://www.vrilology.org/Atlantis_page.htm (offline Nov 13)

*[(d) http://www.cartalk.com/content/winners-worst-opening-lines-literature

(e) Fortean Times No.303 July 2013 p.43]*

 

Jacolliot, Louis (I)

Louis Jacolliot (1837-1890) was a French barrister, a colonial judge (in southern India and Tahiti) and a writer. He was devoutly anticlerical and saw Christianity as a poor imitation of the more ancient oriental religions. . He was the author of The Bible in India[936] in which he traced the Hindu origins of Hebrew and Christian revelation.

He was Jacolliotobsessed with Indian occultism and collected Sanskrit myths and interpreted some of them as telling of a sunken continent, Rutas, in the Indian Ocean. However, he decided to move this lost land to the Pacific and as a consequence, Jacolliot was quoted as an ‘authority’ by Blavatsky when she sought support for her own invention – Lemuria. Later this was embellished even further by William Scott Elliott. Jacolliot presented his sunken land as being echoed by Plato’s Atlantis.

Godwin notes that Jacolliot is also credited with the invention of the story of Agartha[789.81].

At least two of Jacolliot’s books, Occult Science in India(a) and The Bible in India(b), are now available online(a) in English.

(a) http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/osi/

(b) http://archive.org/stream/bibleinindiahind00jacorich#page/n3/mode/2up