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Home » Publications » U.K. newspapers » Daily Mail (London) » Jul – Sep 2010 » September 11, 2010 »

MLA

The Atlantis of Connemara; Sightings of a Phantom Island in the Atlantic in Late Summer Have Been Reported for Centuries, So Why Is It the West’s Best Kept Secret?.” Daily Mail (London). McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. 2010. HighBeam Research. 17 Sep. 2014 <http://www.highbeam.com>.

Please use HighBeam citations as a starting point only. Not all required citation information is available for every article, and citation requirements change over time.

The Atlantis of Connemara; Sightings of a Phantom Island in the Atlantic in Late Summer Have Been Reported for Centuries, So Why Is It the West’s Best Kept Secret?

Daily Mail (London)

September 11, 2010 | Copyright

COPYRIGHT 2007 Daily Mail. This material is published under license from the publisher through the Gale Group, Farmington Hills, Michigan. All inquiries regarding rights or concerns about this content should be directed to Customer Service.

<a href=”http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-236859600.html” title=”The Atlantis of Connemara; Sightings of a Phantom Island in the Atlantic in Late Summer Have Been Reported for Centuries, So Why Is It the West’s Best Kept Secret? | HighBeam Research”>The Atlantis of Connemara; Sightings of a Phantom Island in the Atlantic in Late Summer Have Been Reported for Centuries, So Why Is It the West’s Best Kept Secret?</a>

Byline: by Paul D’Alton

IT was the kind of exquisite Indian Summer’s day we all cherish and, thankfully for many of us, are enjoying at the moment. For Vinnie Delappe, however, it was a late summer’s evening, precisely at this time of year but over three decades ago, which was to make more than a lasting and troubling impression on him.

Aged only 15, as a hazy dusk began to settle around his family’s house in Co. Galway on a quiet, balmy day in September, Mr Delappe nonchalantly strolled out to retrieve some tools from a shed at the back of the homestead to help his father with chores.

The family’s home in Aughrimore, just a short drive from Connemara’s capital of Clifden, overlooks Omey Island, a small strip of coastal beach off Connemara’s mainland and, further beyond, the endless expanse of the Atlantic Ocean stretching as far as the eye can see.

Just a boy, as he walked back to his house, suddenly Mr Delappe looked up and stopped in his tracks. Because there, on the near horizon, a coastal landscape which he had known all his life was suddenly and dramatically transformed.

In the fading, early evening mist, he watched in awe as what he can only describe as a ‘phantom island’ bizarrely appeared in front of him. Terrified and trembling, he ran inside the house and summoned out his parents and seven siblings, to witness this strange, almost supernatural apparition moving and looming in front of them. Mr Delappe, 53, a garden designer in Clifden, picks up the story. He said: ‘I had just gone to the shed and as I was sauntering back to the house I just looked up and there, right in front of me, in the middle of the sea, was a real island, a natural thing you could see in detail. …


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