An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Joining The Dots


Joining The Dots

I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato's own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.


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Ice Dams

Ice Dams were not uncommon following the ending of the last Ice Age. Glacial Lake Missoula in North West America has been estimated to have burst out every fifty years or so over a two thousand year period between 13,000 and 11,000 BC. These events are dealt with in detail by David Alt in his Glacial Lake Missoula[846]. Lake Agassiz was another enormous lake formed by glacial run-off after the last Ice Age and at its maximum extent was larger than any lake existing in the world today. There is evidence that Lake Agassiz like Missoula also breached ice dams from time to time, discharging into the Atlantic. Other large and frequent breaching of ice dams occurred in the Siberian Altai Mountains(c)(d)(e).  A USGS report listing the largest of these events is available online(b).

Recent reports(g)(h)(i) claim that around 6200 BC the bursting of an ice dam in Canada released the melt water contents of Lake Agassiz and Lake Ojibway into the North Atlantic that resulted in Greenland being cooled by an average of 7.4ºC and Europe by about 1ºC and raising the global sea level by between one and three metres (3-10 feet).

Equally dramatic was the extent of the flooding in Eurasia following the collapse of north Asian ice dams. Ronnie Gallagher has an interesting article about this on Graham Hancock’s website(a). Gallagher favours a Eurasian location for Atlantis.

*Professor Neil Glasser from Aberystwyth University is the lead author of a report published in 2016 in Scientific Reports, in which the breaching of an ice dam in South America, between 11,000 and 6,000 BC, was on such a scale that it altered the circulation of the Pacific Ocean. Glasser noted(f) that: “This was a massive lake. When it drained, it released around 1150km3 of fresh water from the melting glaciers into the Atlantic and Pacific oceans – equivalent to around 600 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. This had a considerable impact on the Pacific Ocean circulation and regional climate at the time.”*

 

(a) http://www.grahamhancock.com/forum/GallagherR1.php

(b) http://books.google.ie/books/about/The_World_s_Largest_Floods_Past_and_Pres.html?id=A0SdpwAACAAJ&redir_esc=y

(c) http://www.ica.csic.es/dpts/suelos/hidro/images/chapter_27_phefra.pdf  (offline 1/6/15)

(d) http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2002/pdf/1110.pdf 

(e) http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/Geology/AltaiFlood_red.pdf

*(f) https://phys.org/news/2016-02-catastrophic-failure-ice-age-ocean.html*

(g) ScienceDec. 22, 2000

(h) Proceedingsof the National Academyof SciencesDOI:10.1073/pnas.0510095103]

(i) Quaternary Science Reviewsvol 25, p 63]