An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
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Cesare Emiliani.

Tompkins, Peter

tompkinsPeter Tompkins (1919-2007) was an American journalist, WWII spy and perhaps best known as the author of the 1971 book, Secrets of the Great Pyramid[783] which included an extensive appendix by Livio Catullo Stecchini on the relationship of Ancient Measures to the Great Pyramid.

Tompkins also wrote Mysteries of the Mexican Pyramids as well as over a score of other books on various ‘fringe’ subjects as well as his wartime exploits. He was interested in the mystery of Atlantis and to that end he went to the Bahamas to study the ‘Bimini Road’ but concluded that it was only beach rock.

*A later interview with Tompkins son, Ptolemy, revealed that his “dad was convinced that the Edgar Cayce readings about the rising of Atlantis were correct. He spent thousands and thousands of dollars photographing the limestone formations off Bimini – the so-called “Bimini Road.” My father loved the idea of Atlantis returning because he wanted the world to become a kind of new Eden. He was a true father of the New Age in this sense – he had the core New Age belief that the world once was, and would be again, a better place. But not better in some mundane sense, but in the sense of being elevated back into a spiritualised condition that it had fallen away from. That’s what the Bimini stuff was all about” (a). Apparently, Tompkins left Bimini unconvinced that it had Atlantean credentials.*

Tompkins wrote the foreword to the English translation of Otto Muck’s book, The Secret of Atlantis[0098] and was impressed by Muck’s hypothesis of Atlantis in the Atlantic being destroyed by an asteroid and considered the work of Cesare Emiliani important in support of this contention.

*(a) https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/peter-tompkinss-son-describes-his-fathers-hunt-for-atlantis-and-his-own-belief-in-sex-crazed-demons*

Kukal, Zdenek

kukal1Zdenek Kukal (1932- ) is a respected geologist and oceanographer who works at the Czech Geological Survey, Prague. He wrote a volume debunking the more extreme ideas regarding the Bermuda Triangle and was theauthor of Atlantis in the Light of Modern Research (Earth Science Reviews Vol 21, 1984) translated by Cesare Emiliani. Kukal favoured Santorini as the ‘inspiration’ behind the Atlantis story but as he stated, in a paper delivered to the 2005 Atlantis Conference on Melos, the story is fundamentally ‘pure fiction’.

Emiliani, Cesare (L)

Cesare Emiliani (1922-1995) was bEmiliani, Cesareorn in Bologna, Italy and is often referred to as the founder of paleoceanography. In 1975,  at the University of Miami, Emiliani reported measuring deep-sea cores, taken from the Gulf of Mexico, that demonstrated a shockingly rapid rise of about 325 feet in the world’s sea level — a rate of metres per decade — around 11,600 years ago. When he remarked casually that this was exactly the time Plato had given for the fall of Atlantis his offhand remark was met with severe comments from his peers.

In conversation with Peter Tompkins he suggested that putative Atlantis sites such as the Azores, Spain and locations off the East Coast of the United States could all have been part of the Atlantean empire[802.193].

Emiliani was the translator of Zdenek Kukal’s book Atlantis in the Light of Modern Research (Earth Science Reviews Vol.21).