An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
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Emiliani, Cesare

Cesare Emiliani (1922-1995) was bEmiliani, Cesareorn in Bologna, Italy and is often referred to as the founder of paleoceanography. In 1975,  at the University of Miami, Emiliani reported measuring deep-sea cores, taken from the Gulf of Mexico, that demonstrated a shockingly rapid rise of about 325 feet in the world’s sea level — a rate of metres per decade — around 11,600 years ago.>He suggested that the rupturing of Ice Dams at the end of the last Ice Age and the resulting floods may have given rise to worldwide flood myths, such as the biblical Deluge(a).<

When he also remarked casually that this was exactly the time Plato had given for the fall of Atlantis his offhand remark was met with severe comments from his peers.

In conversation with Peter Tompkins, he suggested that putative Atlantis sites such as the Azores, Spain and locations off the East Coast of the United States could all have been part of the Atlantean empire [802.193].

Emiliani was the translator of Zdenek Kukal’s book Atlantis in the Light of Modern Research (Earth Science Reviews Vol.21).