An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

Latest News

  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
Search

Recent Updates

Cornelius de Pauw

Patriarchs

The Patriarchs referred to in Genesis and their seemingly exaggerated longevity have been a source of continuous debate ever since biblical criticism developed in the 18th century. Cornelius de Pauw  referred to the apparently exaggerated life spans of the biblical patriarchs explaining that it was widespread in the Middle East and further afield to name a dynasty or family after its founder and attribute the total years of its reign to that founder. [1756.258]

Before dePauw, Pierre-Daniel Huet expressed similar views to Samuel Borchart, linking the biblical patriarchs and the story of Atlantis in his Demonstratio Evangelica [1007].

Emilio Spedicato in a paper(f) entitled Large Numbers in Asian Chronology Decrypted  includes some radical ideas on how to resolve the mystery of the ages of the patriarchs recorded in the Bible.

A paper(a) by an unnamed and apparently deceased author was published by Duane L. Christensen. It approaches the ages of the patriarchs from a numerological standpoint with some curious conclusions. I’m wary of such occult claims, but will leave it to readers to decide.

 Zoltan Simon has claimed that the ages of the patriarchs were calculated using 90-day ‘years’ [0549.7].

Another paper by Dean Talboys, entitled Methuselah Debunked(b)(c)(d) offers an convoluted explanation for the ages based on Babylonian astronomy/astrology.

In one(e) of his many papers on ancient chronology, Gérard Gertoux he controversially touches on subjects such as radiocarbon dating, the age of the patriarchs, the Ice Ages, evolution and more.

(a) https://jbburnett.com/resources/ot/christensen-patr-ages.pdf 

(b) https://www.academia.edu/34905518/Methuselah_Debunked_Decoding_the_Biblical_record_for_the_ages_of_Adam_and_his_descendants 

(c) Can the Babylonian Calendar Help Explain the Ages of Patriarchs Recounted in the Book of Genesis? – Part 1 | Ancient Origins (ancient-origins.net)

(d) Can the Babylonian Calendar Help Explain the Ages of Patriarchs Recounted in the Book of Genesis? – Part 2 | Ancient Origins (ancient-origins.net)

(e) https://www.academia.edu/17026643/Noah_and_the_Deluge_Chronological_Historical_and_Archaeological_Evidence  (around one third of the page down)

(f) Migration & Diffusion (migration-diffusion.info)

de Pauw, Cornelius

Cornelius de Pauw (1739-1799) was a Dutch geographer and philosopher, who, although he never visited the continent, was considered a leading expert on America and in that capacity he was a contributor to the Diderot’s Encyclopédie. In a 1768 book[1305] he claimed that the location of Atlantis had been in Central America.

DePauw cites Pliny to explain the Egyptian habit of counting lunar cycles as ‘years’.

He also referred to the apparently exaggerated lifespans of the biblical patriarchs explaining that it was widespread in the Middle East, and further afield, to name a dynasty or family after its founder and attribute the total years of its reign to that founder.[1576.258]