An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
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Luigi Piccardi

Geomythology

Geomythology is a word coined by the geologist Dorothy Vitaliano in her 1973 book Legends of the Earth[306] to describe the study of alleged references to geological events in mythology.”

Since then, the term has gradually gained widespread acceptance including an extensive entry in the Encyclopedia of Geology(a).  The status of the subject has been consolidated by its inclusion as a separate course at the University of Puget Sound(b). Apart from Vitaliano other writers, such as Gerald Wells, have applied geomythology to the study of Atlantis without necessarily using the term(e). I should point out that mythology is also used to transmit details of spectacular astronomical events as well as more mundane political or military exploits.

Further support for the young discipline came with the publication of Myth and Geology by the Geological Society of London in 2007, with Luigi Piccardi & Bruce Masse as editors[1541].

Patrick Nunn, an Australian geologist, who although an Atlantis sceptic has begun to reconsider the possibility of ancient myths containing important geological information(c). A 2017 paper by Nunn gave examples of where the application of geomythology has offered solutions to some old mysteries(g).

Also in May 2021, the BBC offered a lengthy paper, by Mark Piesing, on the development of geomythology in recent years and how it may have implications for our planet’s future(f).

>Professor Timothy John Burbery of Marshall University supports the linkage of the eruption of Thera with the Titanomachy in an August 2021 article(c). He has recently published his new book, Geomythology: How Common Stories Reflect Earth Events [1873].<

Cindy Clendenon, presumably inspired by Vitaliano, has launched a related new specialised field of study, which she has named ‘hydromythology’ in her 2009 book, Hydromythology and the Ancient Greek World [0801], a review of which is available online(d).

(a) https://www.stanford.edu/dept/HPST/MayorGeomythology.pdf

(b) Untitled (archive.org)

(c) https://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20160118-the-atlantis-style-myths-of-sunken-lands-that-are-really-true

(d) https://web.archive.org/web/20190927120932/https://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-08-65.html

(e) https://web.archive.org/web/20160527131112/https://www.wrl-inc.org/tag/geomythology

(f) The myths that hint at past disasters – BBC Future

(g) https://www.bing.com/search?q=how+a+geographer+began+mining+a+myth&cvid=5cae180662dd48d6968fb1c483e2c55d&aqs=edge..69i57.26555j0j1&pglt=43&FORM=ANNTA1&PC=U531

Masse, William Bruce

William Bruce Masse (1948- ) is an environmental archaeologist with the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He turned to mythology as means of W. M. Ewingunravelling some of the world’s historical mysteries.

Italian geologist Luigi Piccardi along with Masse were co-editors of Myth and Geology[1541where it was noted that “Myths are largely event-based, in that they are triggered to a large part by an event, or combination of events, that catastrophically impact society, then these myths provide a window upon those events that can be recovered, retrieved and even dated.”(b)

The publication of Myth and Geology gave a boost to the development of the new discipline of ‘geomythology‘.

In particular, Masse studied 175 flood myths among which two gave clues to a major event that occurred in 2807 BC, which Masse linked to a cometary impact south of Madagascar creating the Burckle Crater and producing a 600-foot tsunami that swept around the world(a). Masse implied a connection with the destruction of Atlantis when he co-authored a paper that was presented to the 2005 Atlantis Conference[0629] on the Burckle Crater.

Similarly, many biblical fundamentalists have adopted the Burckle theory as the most likely cause of Noah’s Deluge, although Masse, as far as I can determine, has not endorsed such a linkage.

Masse is a leading member of the Holocene Impact Working Group.

(a) https://www.sott.net/article/144125-Did-a-Comet-Cause-the-Great-Flood

(b) Table of Contents — January 01, 2007, 273 (1) | Geological Society, London, Special Publications (archive.org) *