An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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Azores

Frandsen, Marius

Marius Frandsen, was a Danish engineer who proposed during the middle of the last century that the Azores region held the location of Atlantis and that its plain lay on an underwater plateau to the south of the current archipelago(a)(b).

N. Zhirov noted [458.363] how Frandsen’s study found the dimensions of the plateau closely matched Plato’s dimensions for the plain.

(a)  “Atlantis – en realitet eller en utopi”, 1969, p.31, Strubes, København

(b) Pyramide Viskom (Pyramid Wisdom) Copenhagen, 1945

Thom, Dieter

Dieter Thom has published a number of papers on the ResearchGate website, which are mainly concerned with aspects of the Book of Revelation. In another of them(a) he claims to have demonstrated that the Azores held the location of Atlantis, using a combination of Google maps and Kircher’s seventeenth century map.

(a) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/309704475_Atlantis_in_the_Azores_of_the_North_Atlantic

d’Ascanio, Alfonso

Alfonso d’Ascanio is a Spanish legal expert with a long-standing interest in Plato’s Atlantis. He is the author of El naufrago del Julán [1734], which is a novel that explores the history of the Canaries and the origins of its Guanche inhabitants. His grandfather published a book in 1922 which investigates the geology of the Canaries. His father, also Alfonso d’Ascanio, was also preparing to finish a book in the late 1950’s(a), which was intended to demonstrate that Atlantis had been situated in the Atlantic, where its remnants are now the Macaronesian groups of islands (Canaries, Azores, Madeira & Cape Verde). D’Ascanio snr also contributed to Egerton SykesAtlantis magazine.

(a) Atlantis, Vol.12, No.1, Nov/Dec 1958

Cook, Rev. Joseph

Rev. Joseph Cook was a late 19th century American lecturer who endeavoured to support religious teaching with science! He had studied in Germany and at Harvard and lectured in New England and old England. Although popular, he did have his critics(a).

Jason Colavito has drawn attention(b) to Cook’s 1883 book Advanced Thought in Europe, Asia, Australia, etc., in which he broadly follows Donnelly and sees the Azores as the remnants of Atlantis, which in turn was the hyperdiffusionist source for the world’s great cultures.

(a) https://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-Stout53-t1-g1-t9.html

(b) https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/a-view-of-atlantis-1883

Darwin, Charles

Charles Darwin (1809-1882) is reported in Wikipedia (a) to have been dismissive of the ideas that others had put forward of sunken continents like Atlantis.” This opinion is dated to around 1855.

Edward Forbes was one of the first, in 1846 [1471], to hypothesise the existence of a continent in the Atlantic linking Ireland, the Azores and the Iberian Peninsula, which was popularly called ‘Atlantis’. Charles Darwin  described his idea as ‘speculative’.

This would appear to conflict with Marco Ciardi, who claimed that Darwin had accepted the existence of Atlantis, I presume later, but did so “under the influence of, among others, the botanist J. D. Hooker” and “reverted to the hypothesis of a lost continent to which the Atlantic islands testified since they constituted the tips of its highest mountains.” This information was cited by Pierre Vidal-Naquet in The Atlantis Story [580.xxii].

Ignatius Donnelly sent a copy of his Atlantis to Darwin, but received a less than enthusiastic response(b).

(a) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Development_of_Darwin%27s_theory

(b) https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/friday-odds-and-ends-on-aliens-atlantis-and-more

Daily Express (UK)

The Daily Express is a well-known British tabloid newspaper. Together with its sister publications, The Sunday Express and its online Express.co.uk, it has recently set a new record for the number of ‘might be Atlantis’ articles published, all with the byline of Callum Hoare. During the first three weeks of 2019, he has managed to produce four stories suggesting four different locations for Atlantis – Doggerland(a), Malta(b), Azores(c) and the Bahamas(d).  But I did not have to wait long for the next regurgitation from Hoare, with another piece mined from a recent Amazon Prime documentary, where the Atlantis in the Canaries theory is reviewed (21.1.19)(e). I note that Hoare was also the author of similar BS Atlantis stories for another alleged UK newspaper, The Daily Star. The quality of research continues to be abysmal, citations are often years old, facts are mangled and quite misleading. Definitely ‘Fake News’.

Unfortunately, this outpouring of nonsense continued on in 2020. June 30th saw the ‘Express’ publish another article(f) by Hoare with an “Atlantis Located” headline. This gem begins by repeating the view of ‘expert’ Matthew Sibson, who advocates Rockall as the site of Atlantis and then switches to the opinions of Christos Djonis who claims the Aegean Sea as the home of Atlantis. According to Hoare, in this instance, Djonis refers to the research of Mark McMenamin of around 25 years ago who noticed on some Carthaginian gold staters of the fourth century BC that they had tiny engravings that he subjectively interpreted as rough maps showing both Asia and America and centred on Sardinia(g). This, according to Djonis, indicates the possibility that the Greeks may have had knowledge of America!

Djonis and Hoare were obviously unaware that in 2000, McMenamin was obliged to confirm that the coins in question were fakes(k) as revealed in his book, Phoenicians, Fakes and Barry Fell [1738].

Furthermore, Djonis is contradicted by the clear statement of Herodotus that the Greeks only knew three continents, Europe, Asia and Libya (Africa)(h). Finally, if Djonis thinks that Atlantis was located in the Aegean what has America got to do with his theory?

July 2020 saw Hoare pollute the Express with another ‘Atlantis Found’ piece, this time locating it off the coast of Cornwall(j). This story is a quarter of a century old and a few years ago its credibility and even the existence of the institution to which its original author, Viatcheslav Koudriavtsev, was supposed to belong to, was brought into question(i).

(a) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1070934/atlantis-uncovered-8000-year-old-ancient-city-doggerland-british-spt

(b) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1071594/atlantis-found-malta-island-matches-plato-description-spt

(c) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1073103/atlantis-exposed-lost-city-historian-stunned-mountains-atlantic-spt

(d) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1074098/atlantis-found-underwater-bimini-florida-edgar-cayce-spt

(e) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1075553/atlantis-found-archaeologist-rock-formation-atlantic-ocean-spt

(g) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/236000049_Cartography_on_Carthaginian_Gold_Staters

(h) Herodotus, Histories 4.42.

(i) https://shimajournal.org/issues/v10n2/k.-Hallerton-Shima-v10n2.pdf

(j) https://www.express.co.uk/news/weird/1314367/atlantis-lost-city-found-plato-atlantic-ocean-russia-cornwall-lands-end-lyonesse-spt

>(k) https://www.academia.edu/37093408/PHOENICIANS_FAKES_AND_BARRY_FELL_SOLVING_THE_MYSTERY_Of_CARTHAGINIAN_COINS_FOUND_IN_AMERICA<

Gorodnitsky, Alexander M.

Alexander M. Gorodnitsky (1933- ) is a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who is a geologist and oceanographer by profession(a). His other interests range from ancient civilisations to music composition. The former led him to conclude that Atlantis had existed and was situated between Gibraltar and the Azores near, the Ampere and Josephine seamounts.>Paulo Riven also favoured the Josephine/Torre seamount region holding the location of Atlantis(b).<

 

(a) https://atlantisforschung.de/index.php?title=Alexander_M._Gorodnitsky

>(b) https://tribesofatlantis.blogspot.com/p/9000-years-and-second-flood-explained.html<

Seven Cities of Antilia, The

The Seven Cities of Antilia are legendary cities reputed to have existed on the island of Antilia situated somewhere in the Atlantic. Medieval cartographers show Antilia (with a variety of spellings) at different locations in that ocean. Belief in its existence was firmly established by the time of Christopher Columbus. His son, Ferdinand, wrote of the many attempts to find it[1536].

For a time it had been thought by some that the Azores was location of Antilia, while Zhirov who believed the Island of the Seven Cities had some association with the North Atlantic Ridge[p.257].

In the early 20th century geographer, W. H. Babcock, identified Cuba as Antilia, while later in 2000, Andrew Collins, in his Gateway to Atlantis[072] devoted two chapters to the subject of the Seven Cities and also concluded that Cuba was its most likely location and by extension was also the home of Atlantis.

Anderson, Robert Edward

Robert Edward Anderson was the author of two books, Extinct Civilizations of the East[1534] and later, Extinct Civilizations of the West [1486]. Inevitably, he touched on the subject of Atlantis in the latter, without expressing any personal opinion regarding its reality. However, he seems to favour the possibility of the Azores or alternatively, the American mainland, quoting Buffon and Lyell.

Father Sergio

Father Sergio is presumably a pen-name of the author of a short book, The Legend of Atlantis[1514].This offering is just a mish-mash of quotes from the Old Testament and Edgar Cayce, placing Atlantis in the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of the Azores. He also cites the highly dubious claims of the late Ray Brown. I think it a good idea that the author kept his identity a secret.