An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
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Guadalquivir River

Aethelman, G.C.

G. C. Aethelman is an historian from Cantabria in Spain. Since 2012 he has published the magazine Atlántida, which focuses on the Bronze Age. In 2017, he bravely entered the battlefield of atlantology with his book Atlántida: el reino del olvido (Atlantis: The Kingdom of Oblivion) [1801]. He places the Atlantean capital in the marshes at the mouth of the Guadalquivir River in Southwest Andalusia.

Cuevas, Manuel

Manuel Cuevas is a Spanish researcher from Sanlucar de Barrameda (Cadiz), who claimed in 2015(a) to Cuevas, Mamuelhave identified the location of what is possibly a lost civilisation in the area of Pinar de La Algaida, covering an area of about 8 square kilometers (5 square miles.) beside the Guadalquivir River in Spain. This location is not far from the better known Atlantis candidate of the Doñana Marshes.

Another site(b) quotes Cuevas as saying ‘I believe 99 percent that I have finally found the lost city of Atlantis’.

(a) https://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/2500-year-old-city-buried-under-flood-sediment-may-belong-lost-civilization-020521

(b) https://www.ancient-code.com/spanish-researcher-claims-to-have-found-atlantis/

Pellicer de Ossau Salas y Tovar, José

José Pellicer de Ossau Salas y Tovar (1602-1679), a Spanish  writer, was probably the pellicerfirst in 1673[1315] to identify an Andalusian location for Atlantis, proposing that Tartessos was identical with Atlantis and that it was located on the Guadalquivir River in southern Spain near Seville. He specified the Doñana Marshes, where, coincidentally, Kühne and Wickboldt had identified ground features using satellite images, which they claimed corresponded with Plato’s description of Atlantis.

However, subsequent excavation there showed Wickboldt’s images to be smaller than expected or were from the Muslim period. Evidence for Tartessos or Atlantis has not been found.