An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

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    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
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Cayce

Acholonu-Olumba, Catherine

Catherine Acholonu-Olumba (1951-2014 ) was from Orlu in Nigeria and well Catherine Acholonuknown as a writer(d), researcher and former lecturer on African Cultural and Gender Studies. She was a frequent contributor to the migration-diffusion website(b). In a recent paper(a) she proposed “that ancient West Africans nurtured a high civilization that was an off-shoot of the fall of Atlantis and the migrations of its peoples in search of new lands.” She also maintained that the West African Igbo language was, in earlier times, a global lingus franca.

Some of her ideas seemed like a melange from Blavatsky/Cayce/Daniken as the following excerpt from a video clip(c) demonstrates,

“By 208,000 BC human evolution was interrupted and Adam, a hybrid, was created through the process of genetic engineering. However, our findings reveal that the creation of Adam was a downward climb on the evolutionary ladder, because he lost his divine essence, he became divided, no longer whole, or wholesome. All over Africa and in ancient Egyptian reports, oral and written traditions maintain that homo erectus people were heavenly beings, and possessed mystical powers such as telepathy, levitation, bi-location, that their words could move rocks and mountains and change the course of rivers. Adam lost all that when his right brain was shut down by those who made him.”

Another paper by Acholonu once again endeavours to link the Igbo language with that of the ancient Egyptians(e).

>Even more intriguing is the claim of an association between Ogham and the Igbo language. Erich Fred Legner noted that “All the words that (Edo)Nyland and (Barry)Fell transcribed were Igbo words, which Dr Catherine Acholonu could easily read and translate. She told Edo Nyland that she had translated the words he transcribed from Ogam stones, but he didn’t believe her at first. When Hugo Kennes found Dr Acholonu’s work on the Internet and started telling all the Ogam researchers he knew including Nyland, Nyland then asked him to get an Igbo dictionary from her.  It was only after her meeting with (Christine)Pellech in Belgium when she “read “all Acholonu’s books and convinced her to write for her site, that it was decided to do the “Igbo Ogam VCV Dictionary”(g)<

Acholonu was one of the authors of They Lived Before Adam: Pre-Historic Origins of the Igbo[1134] which includes some rather wild Igbo-centric claims.

A few years later, she published Eden in Sumer On The Niger [1833], which continued in a similar vein. According to an abstract on ResearchGate,(f) “It provides multidisciplinary evidence of the actual geographical location in West Africa of the Garden of Eden, Atlantis and the original homeland of the Sumerian people before their migration to the “Middle East”. By translating hitherto unknown pre-cuneiform inscriptions of the Sumerians, Catherine Acholonu and Sidney Davis have uncovered thousands of years of Africa’s lost pre-history and evidences of the West African origins of the earliest Pharaohs and Kings of Egypt and Sumer such as Menes and Sargon the Great.” 

(a) https://www.migration-diffusion.info/article.php?id=218

(b) https://www.migration-diffusion.info/article.php?authorid=98

(c) https://igboacienthistory.weebly.com/igbo-language-a-former-global-lingua-franca.html

(d) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_Obianuju_Acholonu

(e) (99+) (PDF) Egypian Sacred and Religious Lexicon – Its Ancient Igbo Foundations and Implications for Egyptology | Chizoro Okeke – Academia.edu

(f) (PDF) Eden In Sumer On The Niger (researchgate.net)

>(g) <Ogam (Ogham) Writing System & Ogam Alphabet (ucr.edu)<

Hoaxes

Hoaxes associated with Atlantis are of various types; the most common sort are those perpetrated by writers who write volumes of balderdash about information they claim to have received through psychic channels. The simple fact that so many of these authors contradict each other demonstrates the fictional nature of their offerings. To be extremely kind, I might accept that some of these people are simply self-deluded but to be brutally honest, I believe that the majority of them are simply churning out their rubbish, in collusion with equally opportunistic publishers, in order to separate gullible readers from their cash.

The father of such drivel has to be Edgar Cayce, although I am inclined to think that he personally was in some way one of the self-deluded and did not have any financial motivation. However, it was pure greed or should it be impure greed that ‘inspired’ the vast majority of writers who followed Cayce, building on his foundation of spurious information.

Other types of hoaxers must include Madame Blavatsky, the godmother of occultic garbage, who was declared a fraud in 1884 by the London Society for Psychical Research. Her first book, Isis Unveiled, published in 1877 devotes just one page out of two volumes to Atlantis. Her second book The Secret Doctrine (1888) expands greatly on her ‘knowledge’ of Atlantis. It is worth pointing out that these extended ‘revelations’ were produced only a few years after the success of Ignatius Donnelly’s groundbreaking book in 1882.

Another strange Atlantean hoax concerns Paul Schliemann the grandson of Heinrich Schliemann the discoverer of Troy. See the Paul Schliemann for fuller details.>Incredibly, there are still writers citing Paul Schliemann’s story as fact.<

A more harmless story, frequently touted in books on Atlantis, is that of the S.S. Jesmond that was reported to have discovered an uncharted island in the Atlantic on which they found artefacts including a sarcophagus complete with an occupant. The ‘discovery’ was published in a New Orleans newspaper after the ship arrived there on April 1st, 1882, the same year that Donnelly’s book was published. The newspaper retracted the story later.

Another frequently quoted claim is the alleged discovery of an underwater pyramid by the late Dr Ray Brown, which does not stand up to the most cursory examination.

Other hoax nominees must include Aaron DuVal(g) and Jerry Querrard.

In 1970 a book entitled Mu Revealed purported to have evidence which supported Churchward’s claims, but was subsequently revealed as a hoax perpetrated by one Raymond Buckland, writing under the pen-name of Tony Earll, an anagram of ‘not really’.

>Carla Sage was an invented British archaeologist, who was reported to have announced in November 2003 her support for a North African location for Atlantis, in particular, she believed that the Gulf of Sidra (Syrtis Major) held their ports,  apparently impressed by ancient accounts that recorded how the Mycenaean, Cretan and Egyptian civilisations all traded with Atlantis. This has now been confirmed as fiction, as the Sage story originally appeared in the now-defunct and largely fictional US tabloid magazine, Weekly World News (11/11/2003). It was then picked up by many less than diligent websites and took on a life of its own.<

Blatant commercial frauds have also been perpetrated invoking Atlantis as the ultimate source. One such instance is the sale of replicas of the so-called ‘Atlantis Ring’, an object that is decorated with special geometric symbols and is claimed to emit electromagnetic waves that protect the wearer, give increased psychic abilities, and healing powers and bring the owner good luck. It is claimed that the original was found in 1860 in the Valley of the Kings by “well-known French Egyptologist” Marquis d’Agrain who claimed that it came from Atlantis. He is supposed to have bequeathed the ring to another “famous Egyptologist” Arnold de Belizal(h). An Internet search reveals little about either person apart from this alleged connection with the Atlantis Ring. Two more articles about it are available online(d)(e), unfortunately, they include a lot of psychic twaddle. One supplier charges $350 for replica rings(a).

There are so many other Atlantis-related claims which stretch credibility beyond breaking point that a book devoted to that subject alone is warranted.

In fact, some years ago the Atlantis Online website had a forum devoted to the subject of Atlantis hoaxes(c). But Atlantis was not the only classical subject that has a hoax associated with it. In 1924, Di Martino, editor of Mouseion, an Italian classics journal, claimed to have discovered all the lost books of Livy(b).

Jason Colavito has written an interesting article(f) on hoaxes, which were more prevalent before WWII.

However, before anyone cries ‘hoax’ or ‘fake’, they should remember the case of the Parian Marble (Parian Chronicle), which was found in two sections on the Greek island of Paros in the 17th century. In 1788, Joseph Robertson (1726-1802) declared the Chronicle to be a ‘modern’ fake in a lengthy dissertation[1401], a claim disproved by the discovery of the final third piece, over a century later.

(a) https://web.archive.org/web/20181103053016/https://www.atlantisring.com/sales/order.aspx

(b) https://www.jasoncolavito.com/1/post/2013/09/the-great-livy-manuscript-hoax-of-1924.html

(c)https://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php?topic=5834.0

(d) History of the Atlantis ring (archive.org) *

(e) Atlantis ring journal at home2b.nl (archive.org) *

(f) https://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/new-york-times-founder-admitted-stories-of-monsters-ancient-artifacts-unearthed-treasure-were-lies *

(g) http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php?topic=5834.0 *

(h) Archive 6669  (private correspondence}  *