An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

Latest News

  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
Search

Recent Updates

Typhon

Typhon

Typhon in Greek mythology is described as a winged serpentine monster who fought Zeus for control of the cosmos and lost. He first appeared in Greek literature in the writings of Homer and Hesiod(b). Many castastrophists have identified the story of Typhon as a description of a close encounter and/or possible impact by a comet. Some atlantologists have endeavoured to link Typhon with Plato’s Atlantis.

>Emilio Spedicato has described the Typhon explosion as ‘a Tunguska type event’, which led to the collapse of great civilisations such as Egypt and Indus at the end of the third millennium BC(c).<

Jürgen Spanuth [15.178] and Walter Baucum [183.36], among others, identified Typhon with Phaëton, while decades later Axel Famiglini proposed that Typhon had destroyed Atlantis located in the Atlantic.

Others have identified Typhon as the comet of Exodus(a), just one of the many speculative suggestions that the myth has generated. However, it is hard not to think that there may have been some real historical event behind the evolution of the story.

(a) https://www.thomasschoenberger.com/blog/comet-of-the-exodus/

(b) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhon

>(c) https://www.migration-diffusion.info/article.php?id=498<

Combes, Michel-Alain

Dr Michel-Alain Combes (1942- ) is a French amateur astronomer with a PhD in astronomy from theCombes Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris VI). For forty years he has studied impact catastrophism and published his views in his book, La Terre Bombardée (The Bombarded Earth). His extensive website(a) endeavours to combine history, myth and science and includes a reference to Atlantis, as well as a kind mention of this site. His book can also be read on his site (French).

Combes further claims that although the legends of Phaeton and Typhon are usually treated as referring to different events that they are records of the same encounter with a comet in the late 13th century BC(c).  He further suggested that Surt, Sekhmet, Typhon, Phaeton, Wormwood, Anat and others are the various names of the comet, seen under different skies, at a time when many civilizations were already well established and thriving.”

Combes delivered a paper in English(b) to a 2008 Conference in Paris entitled; The Apocalypse of the Year 10,000 BC – Myth or Reality? It has been proposed that this event may have created the Carolina Bays and destroyed Atlantis as proposed by Otto Muck.

Furthermore, it has also been linked to the onset of the mini ice age known as the Younger Dryas as described by Firestone, West and Warwick-Smith in their book The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes[0110].

In 1992, Asteroid ‘3446 ombes’ was named in his honour.

(a) http://www.astrosurf.com/macombes/index.html (French) *

(b) https://www.2008-paris-conference.org/mapage9/macombes-younger-dryas-event-1-xx.html.pdf 

(c) ltb2006-chap01 (astrosurf.com) 

Famiglini, Axel

Axel Famiglini is by profession a mechanical engineer and a former member of the Italian Liberal Party. He also has a passionate interest in antediluvian civilisations including Atlantis, which he has studied intently. His views are fairly conventional placing Atlantis in the mid-Atlantic and being destroyed around 9500 BC as a result of a meteorite impact. He believes that this impact is reflected in the myth of Typhon(b). He also thinks that this collision was responsible for the ending of the last Ice Age and the extinction of many species.  His views are only available on Italian websites(a).

 

 

 

 

(a) https://xoomer.virgilio.it/pantarhei/antidiluviane/atlantis.htm#fineatlantide (Offline Nov. 2017) see Archive 2427 

(b) https://xoomer.virgilio.it/pantarhei/antidiluviane/tifone.htm  (Offline Nov. 2017) see Archive 2426