An A-Z Guide To The Search For Plato's Atlantis

Latest News

  • Joining The Dots

    Joining The Dots

    I have now published my new book, Joining The Dots, which offers a fresh look at the Atlantis mystery. I have addressed the critical questions of when, where and who, using Plato’s own words, tempered with some critical thinking and a modicum of common sense.Read More »
Search

Recent Updates

Smithsonian

Termier, Pierre

Pierre Termier (1859-1930) was a French geologist who analysed basaltic lava dredged up from the Atlantic seafloor 500 miles north of the Azores in 1898. Termier was confused termier1when he found that the sample was vitreous rather than crystalline. This had to mean that the water had been submerged after cooling. Since lava disintegrates after 15,000 years Termier was forced to conclude that there had been volcanic activity above sea level in the relatively recent past, perhaps coinciding with the destruction of Atlantis.

In 1912 Termier delivered a lecture[574] to the Institut Océanographique(b) in which he outlined his belief that Atlantis had been located in the Atlantic, a machine translation in English is available here as Archive 3667. A brief 9-page article by Termier, entitled New Light on the Lost Atlantis, has been reprinted by Kessinger Publishing. Termier also addressed the Smithsonian Institute who published his text in their 1915 annual.

In January 1917 a firm rebuttal of Termier’s ideas was written by Charles Schuchert of Yale University and published in Geographical Review,*however, the journal also published a favourable review by Rudolph Schuller in the same edition(a).*

In 1924 Termier he published La Derive des Continents, a paper in which he rejected Wegener’s theory of ‘Continental Drift’ as fanciful.

Although Termier’s claims are still quoted by some as factual, their scientific basis has been gravely undermined long ago, further weakening the case for Atlantis in the Atlantic.

*(a) https://www.jstor.org/stable/207366?seq=6#metadata_info_tab_contents*

(b) https://fr.wikisource.org/wiki/L%E2%80%99Atlantide_(Pierre_Termier)  (French)

Mitchell-Hedges, Frederick Albert

Frederick Albert Mitchell-Hedges  (1882-1959) is famous for a number of matters, including the alleged discovery of the most Mitchell-Hedgesperfect of crystal skulls ever found and the removal without permission of three boxes of pirate booty from Roatan Island, off Honduras, and its sale in New York for $6,000,000(a).

Mitchell-Hedges promoted the idea that Roatan Island or more specifically the smaller island, Helene, at its eastern end, which he described as “the highlands of a vast continent submerged by the Flood”(d) and was a remnant of Atlantis and that its original inhabitants were survivors of its destruction. His daughter Anna (1907-2007), went even further, with a claim that the crystal skull, which she owned until her death in 2007, had an extraterrestrial origin from where it was brought to Atlantis and from there to Belize where it was finally unearthed.>In 1970, Anna was reported, in Sykes’ Atlantis magazine(f), to have written that her father had discovered the skull in a Maya temple in Lubaantun in what was then British Honduras, now Belize!

Therefore, it is obvious that the provenance of the skull is not clear-cut, with claims that it was in fact purchased by Mitchell-Hedges in the 1940’s at a Sotheby’s auction in London(b).

Another reasonably objective article on the subject can also be accessed on the internet(c).

Apart from all this, in 2008, an investigation led by the Smithsonian Institute concluded that all 13 life-size skulls, including the Mitchell-Hedges one, were Victorian fakes(e).

(a) https://ancientlosttreasures.yuku.com/topic/4552/Mitchell-Hedges-and-the-Lost-Treasure-of-Roatan#.VpS-SssrHX4

(b) https://badassofteweek.com/hedges.html

(c) https://www.archaeology.org/online/features/mitchell_hedges/index.html

(d) https://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/55569660?searchTerm=Atlantis discovered&searchLimits=

(e) https://allthatsinteresting.com/crystal-skull?utm_source=pubexchange_twitter&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=pubx_ancient_orig

>(f) Atlantis, Vol. 24, No. 1/2, Jan-March, 1971.<